It all started with Emil Berliner

The name "Emil Berliner Studios" does not refer to our location in Berlin, but to Emil Berliner (1851–1929), the inventor of the gramophone and the gramophone record. In 1898, only 10 years after inventing the gramophone record, Berliner founded the "Deutsche Grammophon Gesellschaft" in Hanover. In 1900, the society's first recording studio was opened in Berlin.

As former in-house recording department of the renowned classical record label Deutsche Grammophon, Emil Berliner Studios can look back on a proud tradition of no fewer than 120 years. With countless seminal productions and the development of many groundbreaking technological innovations, our studio has made recording history.

Over time technology changed drastically, as did ownership structures: while the development of recording media went from 7-inch shellac record to 12-inch LP to CD, names such as Telefunken, Siemens and Philips appeared in the studio's history as well as Polydor, PolyGram and, finally, Universal Music.

In May 2008, a management buyout finally led to the founding of "EBS Productions GmbH & Co. KG". The name "Emil Berliner Studios" is continued with this company, which has since developed into an independent production studio for acoustic music: We are still very active in the field of classical music, but have expanded our recording activities with great success to include jazz, crossover and film music productions. Our clients include various large and small labels, solo artists, orchestras, bands as well as composers and producers from all over the world.

The studios were relocated several times – the last major change took place when Emil Berliner Studios was reestablished as an independent production studio and moved from the long-standing site Hanover-Langenhagen location to Berlin. Since spring 2010, our studios are located in Köthener Straße in the heart of the city, just a stone's throw away from Potsdamer Platz.

Pictures from the history of a recording studio

120 years in the history of a recording studio

Technical, artistic and political changes since the end of the 19th century, presented in pictures and documents – a selection from more than 120 years of recording history.

120 years in the history of a recording studio
1887

Emil Berliner applies for a patent for his "Gramophone" system in the USA and drives forward the development of records as a mass media.

1887
1888

Berliner's invention is based on etching the groove into a zinc plate. Only in 1901 he replaces the zinc plate with a wax plate into which a much smoother (lower noise) groove can be cut.

1888
1890

Physicist Heinrich von Helmholtz invites Emil Berliner to demonstate his gramophone in Berlin – not only a sweeping success but also a great honour for the self-educated Berliner.

1890
1890

Emil Berliner visits his hometown Hanover and commissions the first gramophones from the dolls factory Kämmerer & Reinhardt, located on the edge of the Thuringian Forest.

1890
1895

The record industry's nucleus: Emil Berliner (front left) with his colleagues, including the later famous recording engineers Fred Gaisberg, William Sinkler Darby and Joe Sanders (behind Berliner, from left to right).

1895
1898

London, Henrietta Street: in a hotel Berliner's recording specialists Gaisberg und Sanders set up a recording studio for the recently founded Gramophone Company.

1898
1898

Hanover, Kniestraße: together with his brother Joseph (2nd from right), Emil Berliner founds the Deutsche Grammophon Gesellschaft, the world's first exclusive record factory.

1898
1900

Berlin, Ritterstraße: Deutsche Grammophon opens a branch with recording studios, the equipment is provided by the Gramophone Company, the British parent company.

1900
1905

Recording expedition, Bombay: Max Hampe from Deutsche Grammophon and his colleague William Sinkler Darby from the British Gramophone Company.

1905
1909

Yasnaja Polyana, Leo Tolstoy's country estate south of Moscow: Max Hampe records the great poet reading, Tolstoy personally signs the wax discs.

1909
1909

Hanover, Podbielskistraße: Joseph Berliner's engineers continually work on refining record technology.

1909
ca. 1910

The Hanover factory does not only press records, gramophones are assembled there as well. However, the recording studios are still in Berlin, the music metropolis.

ca. 1910
1911

Berlin, Ritterstraße: With recording engineer Charles Scheuplein from the Gramophone Company working the movable horns, Bruno Seidler-Winkler conducts a recording with tenor Karl Jörn at the Deutsche Grammophon's studio.

1911
1913

Berlin, Ritterstraße, Sep 12: Alfred Hertz, conductor of New York's Metropolitan Opera, records excerpts from Wagner's »Parsifal« with the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra.

1913
1915

World War I turns colleagues into enemies: Vice Sergeant Max Hampe (middle) on the Western Front. Gramophone Company and Deutsche Grammophon are torn apart.

1915
1917

The assets of Gramophone Company Ltd., which owns the shares of Deutsche Grammophon AG, are confiscated by the German Reich and acquired by Polyphon-Musikwerke AG in a foreclosure sale.

1917
ca. 1920

The Berlin recording department has to be reorganized due to the separation from the London Gramophone Company. Recording engineers are hired - here Paul Goile with Wilhelm Kempff in the studio.

ca. 1920
1921

Berlin, Markgrafenstraße: Opera diva Frieda Hempel, conductor Bruno Seidler-Winkler, sound engineer Paul Goile (white coat) and orchestra at Deutsche Grammophon's new recording studio, in use from 1918 until 1932.

1921
around 1922

The director's office at 76 Markgrafenstrasse. Presumably director Hugo Wünsch, conductor and arranger Bruno Seidler-Winkler and musical recording director Hans B. Hasse.

around 1922
1922–1925

Walter Buhre develops the electric recording process for Deutsche Grammophon. In 1929 he goes to Japan to work as a recording engineer and head of the Polydor Nippon factory until 1953.

1922–1925
1926

Paul Godwin & orchestra in the studio. Recording engineer Walter Buhre tries out many microphones and constructs his own models as well: here's the Reisz microphone and a rarely used cathodophone from the company C. Lorenz.

1926
1928

Berlin, Musikhochschule am Zoo: Recording engineer Carl Friedrich Ehrich on the (wax) cutting lathe inside the control room. More and more larger orchestra recordings are made in concert halls with mobile technology.

1928
ca. 1928

Walter Schindler, workshop manager at the Berlin recording department, builds electrical cutterhead systems for Deutsche Grammophon's recording devices based on Buhre's plans.

ca. 1928
1929

Circuit drawings for main and loudspeaker amplifiers from Walter Schindler's personal notebook. Most of the studio equipment is developed and built in-house.

1929
1929

Recording expedition in Persia, 8 January: " ... and for the fourth time we pulled the vehicle out of the ditch. On the far right Mr. Blaesche at work".

1929
ca. 1930

Chemist Dr. Marie Finkelstein, responsible for the production of the recording waxes, develops the secret recipe for the "Finkelstein waxes". Here, recording engineer Ehrich checks the sound quality of a cut.

ca. 1930
1930

Paris, Polydor Studio: Producer Erna Elchlepp and Maurice Ravel during the recording session of the »Boléro«. The recording equipment had been brought in from Berlin.

1930
1933

Deutsche Grammophon's General Director Bruno Borchardt and his colleague Fritz Schönheimer flee to France. Schönheimer takes over from Erna Elchlepp as director of the Société Phonographique Française Polydor.

1933
1933

Paris: Farewell to Erna Elchlepp in May (center, framed by Herbert Borchardt and Fritz Schönheimer). Borchardt and Schönheimer emigrate to New York in 1941.

1933
1935

Log of a recording with James Kok and his orchestra. The recording waxes are developed at the in-house electroplating facility in Berlin, the factory in Hanover receives the finished metalworks.

1935
1937

Berlin, Lützowstraße: Richard Strauss at Deutsche Grammophon's recording studio. Soon after, the studio is demolished in the course of Albert Speer's plans for the monumental redesign of the city of Berlin.

1937
1938

Berlin, Alte Jakobstraße: Deutsche Grammophon sets up two recording studios in the former Central-Theater. Apart from dance music and classical music, more and more propaganda recordings are being made.

1938
1938

Berlin, Alte Jakobstraße: Recording engineer Oskar Blaesche in a control room. Two wax cutting machines from Neumann can be seen in the front, as well as the round boxes with recording waxes.

1938
1939

Herbert von Karajan in the studio at Alte Jakobstraße. Recordings are made with two machines running simultaneously, just to be safe.

1939
1941

During a presentation for new owner Siemens, director Hugo Wünsch outlines recording technology. One year later, Dr. Emil Duhme (Siemens) develops the process of silvering recording waxes in a vacuum for Deutsche Grammophon.

1941
1943

Recording log of Charlie and his Orchestra. This big band is put together for propaganda purposes during the Nazi era, producing jazz and other »ostracized music« for German radio broadcasts abroad.

1943
1945

The studio at Alte Jakobstraße is destroyed in an air raid. Some recording equipment can be salvaged from the rubble, but is confiscated by the Russian occupation forces shortly after.

1945
1945

Berlin, Ringbahnstraße: Record presses are installed in Deutsche Grammophon's bombed-out administration building to supply the Soviet sector with records. A studio is being planned, but the location is abandoned in 1949.

1945
1945

Hanover, Podbielskistraße: a second recording department is built on the site of the heavily destroyed factory.

1945
1945

Starting over: in October, the first recordings are made on magnetic tape instead of wax at the Capitol in Hanover.

1945
from 1945

The new recording department in Hanover now relies entirely on the new media magnetic tape. A musical editing of the recordings is now possible.

from 1945
1949

Berlin: During the Berlin Blockade, Candy Bombers fly over the studio every 3 to 4 minutes. The low-frequency engine noise can often be heard on tape and is visible in the spectral analysis.

1949
1949

Dr. Gerd Schöttler and Alexander Schaaf develop the variable groove control system "Variable Micrograde 78". This allows for an increase of playing time from 5 to 9 minutes, which opens up new possibilities for repertoire.

1949
1950

Helmut Naida and Georg Söffker during the transfer of a tape recording. New feed-back cutterheads can cut the groove on lacquer instead of wax. The frequency response is extended to 15,000 Hz, a huge increase in quality.

1950
1952

Hamburg, Studio "Erholung": The permanently installed Studio II is expanded, a Hammond organ is purchased. Recording of "Vis à vis, mon ami" with Michael Jary and Renée Franke.

1952
1952

Hanover, Beethovensaal: recording with Heinz Wildhagen, Hans Westphal and Werner Grimme. The mixing console has four channels. Neumann U-47 microphones are mainly being used.

1952
1954

Berlin, Jesus-Christus-Kirche: Due to the church's excellent acoustics, only a single Neumann microphone with an omnidirectional M48 microphone capsule is used here.

1954
1956

Günter Hermanns assists recording engineer Werner Wolf on the first stereo mixer in the recording department. Five channels are routed directly to the left and right sum, a panpot is not yet available in the channel strips.

1956
1959

Berlin, Jesus-Christus-Kirche: A permanent recording studio with a 12-channel tube mixer is installed, with panpots for no fewer than 6 channels. This console is still being used at our studio.

1959
1960

Dresden, control room at Lukaskirche: During the recording of Strauss's »Elektra«. From left to right: Wolfgang Lohse, Heinrich Keilholz, Jean Madeira, Karl Böhm, Hans-Peter Schweigmann, Inge Borgk and Magdalene Padberg.

1960
1962

Munich: Technician Wolfgang Werner, Karl Richter, recording producer Hans-Peter Schweigmann and recording engineer Hans Weber during a recording session.

1962
1962

Munich, Residenz: The recording department equips the studio with the new 18-channel tube mixing console.

1962

Ernst von Siemens, chairman of the board at Deutsche Grammophon, often visits the control room during recordings – here with Volker Martin, Carl Orff, Siegfried Janzen and Hans Weber.

1964

Milan, La Scala: Recording »Rigoletto«. To improve the acoustics, the auditorium is lined with foil. A scaffolding keeps the singers at the desired distance from the microphone.

1964
1967

Berlin, studio on the Ufa site: Recording »Così fan tutte«. The radar from nearby Tempelhof airport causes high-frequency interferences, which requires special shielding of the cables.

1967
1971

Boston, Symphony Hall: Peter K. Burkowitz (3rd from left) presents the new control room to the international press.

1971
1971

Boston, Symphony Hall: Günter Hermanns in the recording studio. In Boston, more and more productions are made in multitrack technology for quadrophonic reproduction.

1971
1973

Leverkusen, Forum: Carl Orff, Herbert von Karajan, recording engineer Günter Hermanns, recording producer Hans Weber, technicians Jürgen Bulgrin and Volker Martin in the mobile control room.

1973
1974

Know-how transfer: Technical director of the recording department Ernst Kwoll (left) and Thomas Maler (right) interview Walter Buhre, who had developed the electrical recording process at DG 50 years before.

1974
1974

Munich: Hans-Peter Schweigmann, Werner Mayer and Edith Mathis on the new PolyGram module mixer during a recording.

1974
ca. 1975

Hanover-Langenhagen: Klaus Behrens in the new recording center editing 4-track tapes.

ca. 1975
ca. 1975

Hanover-Langenhagen: Hans Weber and Klaus Scheibe mixing a multitrack recording.

ca. 1975

Hanover, Podbielskistraße: Michael Tilson Thomas, Christoph Eschenbach and managing director Dr. Hans-Werner Steinhausen during a transfer.

ca. 1975

Günther Struck is significantly involved in the development and quality control of cutting technology at Deutsche Grammophon.

ca. 1975
ca. 1975

Physicist Oswald Stephani in Deutsche Grammophone's acoustic laboratory.

ca. 1975
ca. 1975

Each recording has to undergo a musical and technical quality check before it can be released. In this picture, Otto Ernst Wohlert is checking a test pressing.

ca. 1975
1975

Shortly before the introduction of digital technology, the company is working on the introduction of diamond styli for lacquer mastering instead of sapphire to further improve the quality of analog records.

1975
1976

Hanover-Langenhagen: Recording producer Hans Weber listening to and editing the analog multitrack tapes of the »Meistersinger« production. Two 16-track 2 inch Studer A80 are used for editing.

1976

Editing score with 16-track tape snippets. In case an edit has to be changed again later, these snippets are pasted into the score.

Hanover-Langenhagen: Recording manager and recording engineer Wolfgang Mitlehner listens to a chamber music recording and creates the editing plan for the 1/4 inch 2-track tapes – editing with scissors and adhesive tape.

1979

Vienna, Musikverein: Leonard Bernstein, recording producer Hans Weber and recording engineer Klaus Scheibe in the control room listening to a »Fidelio« production on 8-track tapes.

1979

Hanover-Langenhagen: Hella Schröder on the VMS 70 in the studio, after relocation to the new recording center.

1977

In the Special Projects department, Klaus Hiemann and Jost Haase develop devices and applications for aspects such as reverberation measurement and artificial head recordings. Several of them are patented.

1977
1979

Starting in January, the recordings are produced in analog as well as the new digital technology. Since no digital editing suite is operational at that point, the productions are still edited and published in analog format.

1979
1980

Rainer Höpfner using the prototype of a digital Sony editing suite, which is being developed together with the recording department.

1980
1981

Hanover-Langenhagen: Leonard Bernstein with Dr. Hermann Franz, Klaus P. Burkowitz and Godefried Schulze in the cutting studio next to a Neumann VMS 80. The new digital recordings are still only being released on vinyl.

1981
1982

Hanover-Langenhagen: Jobst Eberhardt editing the "Alpensinfonie", the first official CD release of DGG. It was digitally recorded in 1980 on 24 tracks.

1982
1982

Hanover-Langenhagen: In Plant II, Dr. Hermann R. Franz and Claudio Arrau present the Compact Disc to the press.

1982
ca. 1983

Hanover-Langenhagen: Hans-Peter Schweigmann at the Recording Center. The Sony DAE 1100 is available as a digital 2-track editing suite.

ca. 1983
1984

New York: Leonard Bernstein records »West Side Story«. Two Sennheiser PZM microphones glued on Plexiglas are used as main microphones.

1984
1991

In cooperation with Yamaha, the DMC 1000 digital mixing console is developed and introduced for recording and post-production.

1991
1991

London: Stefan Shibata during a recording with the possibility of comparing analog and digital mixing consoles.

1991
1994

Cologne: Recording producer and recording engineer Karl-August Naegler in the control room during a recording in 24-bit technology (4-track / Nagra-D).

1994
1996

Hanover-Langenhagen: At the suggestion of chief recording engineer Klaus Hiemann, the street in front of the factory is also renamed after the inventor of the gramophone record.

1996
1995

Hanover-Langenhagen: The recording department moves into a new building with 18 post-production studios, named after the company's founder Emil Berliner.

1995
1996

Hanover-Langenhagen: Klaus Hiemann mixing at the Emil Berliner Haus. The recording department modifies their digital Sony 3324 multitrack recorders from 16 to 24 bit.

1996
1998

The first multi-track recordings in 96 kHz are a veritable battle of matériel - here 16 tracks in 24 bit.

1998
1999

Berlin: production using a Reisz microphone from 1925. From left to right: Rainer Maillard, Manfred Hibbing (Sennheiser), Max Raabe, Klaus Hiemann and Wolf-Dieter Karwatky.

1999
2002

Variable polar pattern: in cooperation with Mr. Hibbing (Sennheiser), prototypes are created that render separate signals from two capsules: omni/figure of eight (left) and double diaphragm cardioid (right).

2002

Bernd Moldenhauer checks a historical mould with the microscope to start with a remastering.

2005

Hanover-Langenhagen, Emil Berliner Studios: Recording engineer and expert for historical tapes Andrew Wedman behind an analog 3-track Ampex machine.

2005
2006

Caracas: Gustavo Dudamel and the Simón Bolívar Symphony Orchestra of Venezuela. The recording equipment is becoming smaller and lighter and is transported by plane.

2006
2006

Dresden, Lukaskirche: Rolando Villazón and Anna Netrebko during a recording.

2006
2007

Berlin, Jesus-Christus-Kirche: Hans-Ulrich Bastin, Ulrich Vette, Pierre Boulez, Matthias Spindler and Christian Gansch in the control room during the recording of Mahler's Eighth Symphony.

2007
2008

A management buy-out leads to the founding of "EBS Productions GmbH & Co. KG", which carries on the name "Emil Berliner Studios": Rainer Höpfner, Hans-Ulrich Bastin, Rainer Maillard, Evert Menting and Stephan Flock.

2008
2008

Vienna, Musikverein: recording operations continue without interruption – mobile recording with Vladimir Repin and Riccardo Muti.

2008
2009

Hanover-Langenhagen: Ulrich Tukur at Emil Berliner Studios, the last recording before the relocation to Berlin.

2009
2010

Berlin, Köthener Straße: After a long period of structural restoration, we move in.

2010
2011

Berlin, Köthener Straße: Recording in the new studio.

2011
2011

The Emil Berliner Studios are reviving the almost forgotten direct-to-disc recording process. Recording engineer Stephan Flock checks the miking in the Meistersaal.

2011
2012

Baden-Baden: Recording engineer Daniel Kemper setting up microphones for the live recording of a Mozart opera.

2012
2014

Berlin, Philharmonie: For the first time in almost 70 years, Emil Berliner Studios is carrying out a mobile direct-to-disc recording. Maarten de Boer assists Sir Simon Rattle in signing the lacquer master.

2014
2016

Recording session with Sting and a Syrian ensemble in the Emil Berliner Studios.

2016
2016

Before we delude ourselves – hearing tests in the form of blind tests...

2016
2017

As a team: Julian Helms, Stephan Flock, Rainer Maillard, Frederic Stader, Justus Beyer, Angela Chastenier, Philip Krause and Lukas Kowalski at Emil Berliner Studios.

2017
2018

Tape box of a "Carmen" recording from 1977. This analog 16-track recording is being remastered and re-released on SACD in Japan. Two years later, a 5.1 surround sound and Dolby Atmos mix follow.

2018
2018

Emil Berliner goes immersive: Listening session and discussion about sound philosophy in 3D audio.

2018
2020

Binaural recordings using an artificial head are not a new invention – however, they always cause astonishment.

2020

Do you have any comments, criticism or additions? Then please write to us. We are looking for more photos, sources and documents about the history of Emil Berliner Studios.

The history of the record - a chronicle by Peter K. Burkowitz

Peter K. Burkowitz, former CTO at Polygram and thus also part of the long Emil Berliner Studios history, wrote an extensive chronicle about the history of sound recording and kindly made this available for us. The chronicle starts with Emil Berliner's birth in 1870, highlights numerous important milestones of sound recording development and ends with the relocation of Emil Berliner Studios from Hannover to Berlin in 2010.

Mr Burkowitz died in June 2012 at the age of 92. We are indepted to him for his extensive research and kind permission to use this chronicle for our purposes, and we will keep him in fond memory.

 

1870

Emil (or Emile) Berliner, born on May 20, 1851, immigrates to the USA together with a friend of the family, Nathan Gotthelf. On arrival he takes an interest in the newly developed telephone technology, creating an improved microphone for this device. The fact that Alexander Graham Bell acquires the patent for it for the sum of 50,000 $ renders Berliner financially independent for the foreseeable future and enables him to open a laboratory. When he returns to Germany for a short period together with his brother Joseph, they found the Joseph Berliner Telephone Co., the first such plant in Europe at that time.

 

1887

After his return to the USA on September 26, Berliner applies for a patent on his fully operational “gramophone” recording system, based on a method of etching a lateral cut into a zinc disc. He is granted American Patent No. 15232 on November 8, 1887. Prior to this there had been only one other vertical cut-type of record, submitted for patenting on April 24, 1878 by Thomas A. Edison, and granted, as soon as August 6 of the same year (British Patent 1644), but Edison´s simultaneous application for an American patent was rejected on the grounds of “British Priority”. Although the drafts supporting his application anticipate the “gramophone”, Edison could not provide an operational specimen.

 

1893

Emil Berliner founds the United States Gramophone Company. Fred Gaisberg, who is his first record producer, quickly wins world fame.

 

1895

On October 8, Emil Berliner founds the Berliner Gramophone Company in Philadelphia. This time he invites shareholders to provide an increase in share capital. To further enlarge the contract basis, this company merges with the Victor Talking Machine Co. under Frank Seaman in 1904. It is acquired in 1929 by RCA, creating the label RCA Victor.

 

1896

Emil Berliner transfers all U.S. rights of sale for fifteen years to the National Gramophone Company, founded by Seaman, but based on the first fully operational spring drive by Eldridge R. Johnson. Seaman´s company also takes the job of producing and delivering all exports, but it soon meets considerable displeasure in the countries involved on account of its exclusively American repertoire.

 

1897

In consequence Berliner commissions two U.K. partners, William Barry Owen and Trevor Williams, to create an international repertoire by founding the UK Gramophone Company, initially meant to be no more than an artist & repertoire centre.

In New York and Philadelphia recording studios are established.

Hard rubber is replaced by shellac for pressing records.

 

1898

Berliner´s recording specialists Fred Gaisberg and Joe Sanders establish their first recording studio in Europe in rooms of the Cockburn Hotel, London, Henrietta Street.

Berliner´s U.S. production partner Frank Seaman is suspicious about of all this activity and stops delivering to Berliner´s distribution network. Berliner calls up an ad-hoc meeting with his closest associates, resulting in the decision to establish an improvised record production plant in the Hannover-based telephone factory of Berliner´s brothers Joseph and Jacob. J. Sanders is sent to Hannover to give a hand. The manoeuver succeeds and invalidates Seaman´s attempts at an embargo. Contrary to all expectations, the initially makeshift production in Hannover flourishes, which induces Berliner to found Deutsche Grammophon GmbH through his brothers Joseph and Jacob (on December 6). It includes a modest amount of record player construction, based on components from the USA. By the outbreak of World War I Berliner´s recording business has already turned into an international market leader.

 

1900

In view of a patenting dispute in the USA Berliner transfers his company headquarters to Canada and founds the Gram-O-Phone Co in the suburb Saint-Henri of Montréal. The “dog tag” is given the logo His Master´s Voice.

On June 27, Deutsche Grammophon GmbH is transformed into a corporation, founded by Deutsche Grammophon GmbH, Orpheus Musikwerke GmbH, Leipzig, and UK Gramophone Company, London, which soon acquires all shares.

Because of the change of name in London the production plant in Hannover is temporarily renamed Gramophone & Typewriter GmbH (until 1908).

The headquarters of Deutsche Grammophon AG and the record player production are transferred to Markgrafenstraße 76 in the centre of Berlin, including a recording studio with a workshop. Theodore B. Birnbaum, one of the founders of Berliner Gramophone Co. in Philadelphia, is made managing director.

Further subsidiaries are established in Russia and Austria.

Technically, etching in zinc is replaced by wax cutting. (For the production of the original Berliner had so far used a zinc disc covered by a thin layer of hard fat. During the recording process the pin connected with the membrane of the sound box cuts through this layer down to the metal surface, so that the waveform embossed into the fat layer precisely represents the musical undulations. The zinc disc “inscribed” in this way is submerged in an acidic solution which “bites” a deep, channel-shaped groove into the metal. The copper tools, father, mother and matrix, are made from this original by using well-known galvano-plastic procedures. But the resulting groove surfaces are not smooth enough, which causes considerable noise when the record is played. That is why this method is soon abandoned in favor of the generally accepted one of cutting a v-shaped smooth groove into a massive, circular wax disc by using a polished cutting stylus.)

 

1901

Extension of the disc format from 17 to 25 cm; introduction of paper labels.

By this time, Berliner´s Canadian GRAM-O-PHONE has already sold two million records, established a Nipper-decorated shop in the Rue Sainte-Catherine (Montréal) and opened up a lavishly equipped recording studio as well. This offers many jazz musicians the opportunity of undisturbed (and highly successful) recording sessions due to the hate campaign launched in the USA by car manufacturer H. Ford against jazz as “Jewish machinations” [see Article by Lothar Baier in the German newspaper DIE ZEIT].

An advert by Deutsche Grammophon promises: “We offer you 5,000 records in all languages of the world!” (Thanks to Gaisberg – the author) “Strongest, most natural sound! Hard discs, no soft cylinders!”

 

1902

The first six records are made with the young tenor Enrico Caruso for a fee of just 100 £ (1 £ = 20 Reichsmark = a wage of ten days of work).

For the first time the diameter of the recordmeasures 30 cm; the playing time is ca. 5 minutes.

1901/02: The company pays a dividend of 25 %.

Owing to the dearth of space in the plant Kniestraße/Hannover, the company leases a site on Podbielskistraße. (Before this, the plant had resided in Celler Straße, Groß-Buchholz, Separatorenfabrik Franz Daseking.)

 

1903

DGG buys out its recent competitor International Zonophon Company, Berlin, and divides its supply policy into the upper-price bracket (DG Classics, emblem “the writing angel”) and the lower-price bracket (Zonophon, light and folk music, distribution by wholesale).

 

1904

Theodore B. Birnbaum moves to London as director general of all European gramophone companies. His successor in Berlin is N. M. Rodkinson from the St. Petersburg subsidiary.

The first double-sided records appear.

The retail trade of records is gradually transferred from toy and bicycle shops to those selling music instruments, then the specialist trade.

 

1906

200 presses are at work in Hanover with a daily output of 36,000 records.

 

1907

The Gramophone Co. acquires a site with railway access in Hayes near London, where a new, extensive plant is being built, because worldwide demand had turned the idea of producing records in Hanover alone obsolete.

The first cut of the spade for the head office, the plant and the studios is made by tenor Edward Lloyd in February 1907, the laying of the foundation stone is executed by singer Nellie Melba.

Rodkinson leaves Berlin for India. After him DG AG is directed by Leo B. Cohn. When he marries singer Elisabeth von Endert he changes his family name to “Curt”.

The newest fad at this time are concerts via gramophone performed in large halls. To enhance the sound volume, DG technicians develop an “Auxetophon”, based on pneumatic amplification, but the amount of background noise it creates renders it ephemeral soon.

The first machines without horns appear, integrating the sound guiding devices into the cabinet.

 

1908

The output before World War I is 6.2 million records a year.

The plant site on Podbielskistraße is now made the property of the company, no longer just a lease. The company is given back its original name (see 1900).

At this time, the workshop producing record players in Berlin employs more than 100 people, but drive mechanisms and sound boxers are still imported from the USA.

Arranger and producer Bruno Seidler-Winkler acquires lasting merit by writing instrumentation especially suited for recording.

In Berlin, the two recording engineers and brothers Max and Franz Hampe (Deutsche Grammophon AG) work alongside the recording pioneers Fred Gaisberg, William Sincler Darby, Charles A. Scheuplein and Ivor R. Holmes (The Gramophone Company, Hayes).

 

1909

The emblem “the writing angel” is replaced by “His Master´s Voice”.

To provide business models for the retail trade, the Grammophon Spezialhaus GmbH is founded, opening subsidiaries in Berlin, Breslau, Düsseldorf, Köln, Königsberg, Kiel and Nürnberg.

 

1913

Beethoven´s 5th Symphony, played by a full orchestra, the Berlin Philharmonic under Arthur Nikisch, is recorded for DGG on four double-sided records – a total novelty!

 

1914

When World War I begins, German assets are confiscated in Great Britain. In retaliation, British property is sequestered in Germany and offered for sale, among others the DG AG as subsidiary of a British company.

 

1917

On April 24, Polyphon Musikwerke, founded in Leipzig-Wahren on May 24, 1895, acquires DG AG. PML had produced only musical boxes and orchestrions before this.

 

1918

Both companies trade under the name Polyphon AG and establish their head offices in Markgrafenstraße 76, Berlin, enlarging the recording capacity to three rooms. Bruno Borchardt is made director general, Hugo Wünsch former authorized signatory at PML since 1908, becomes head of the new subsidiary DG AG. Joseph Berliner remains a member of the boards until his retirement in 1921. Leo B. Curth, executive director of DG AG until 1918, takes the wheel at Grammophon Spezialhaus GmbH.

 

1919

The Austrian subsidiary Polyphon-Sprechmaschinen und Schallplatten GmbH is founded in Vienna.

Nordisk Polyphon A. S. is founded in Kopenhagen; in Stockholm the Swedish subsidiary is called Nordisk Polyphon A. B.

As large portions of the world-famous pre-war repertoire cannot be used on account of the divided rights of ownership between the previous British mother company and her German subsidiaries, a new repertoire has to be established as quickly as possible. Karl Holy, director at the Berlin State Opera House, and Hans B. Hasse, conductor and head of the recording department of the newly installed companies, work together with technician Walter Buhre and employees Oskar Blesche, Paul Goile, Fritz Lehmann, Mr. König and Carl Friedrich Ehrich at creating a new, attractive catalog in a very short time. Nevertheless, it persists until the end of World War II. They are ably supported by Maria Ivogün, Emmi Leisner, Heinrich Schlusnus, Tino Pattiera, Wilhelm Kempff, Wilhelm Backhaus, Raoul v. Koczalski, Carl Flesch, Richard Strauss, Hans Pfitzner, Leo Blech, Herman Abendroth, and others. Recording sessions mostly take place in the music academy in Berlin-Zoo, in the Bach Hall, or the “Liedertafel”, Urbanstraße, in the Alte Jakobstraße, in the Beethoven Hall and in the Cinema Hall on Lützowstraße. These rooms are damped as effectively as possible by carpets and curtains. Until 1946, all insiders in this line of business are convinced that acoustically authentic records must contain no other sounds but those made by the instruments or the voices of the singers (direct sound). But then Keilholz manages to change this habit by introducing the lively acoustic atmosphere he had learnt to create during his years at the Reichsrundfunkgesellschaft by using modern broadband technology.

Robert Blanke is made head of the Hanover plant in his capacity of authorized signatory.

 

1922

Three years prior to the introduction of the electro-acoustic recording and reproduction technologies, engineers of DGG create wax records by using an experimentally developed electro-magnetic cutter head.

 

1924

Berliner sells his GRAM-O-PHONE Co., including the NIPPER trademark, to the Victor Talking Machine Co.

 

1925

DG engineer Buhre writes a lab report on the successful design of an electromagnetic cutter capable of recording 100 to 4500 Hz.

The acousto-mechanical recording and reproduction sysem is gradually replaced by the electro-acoustico-magnetic system in all broadcasting and recording studios worldwide.

 

1926

At DGG Dr. Waldemar Hagemann replaces graphiting of wax discs by electro-chemical silvering to render their surfaces conductive to galvanization.

In Berlin Buhre employs Walter Schindler as precision engineer, then as head of the workshop.

 

1927

The Berlin Philharmonic under Wilhelm Furtwängler playing Beethoven´s 5th Symphony is recorded for the first time.

A contract on matrix exchange is concluded between DGG and the Brunswick-Balke-Collander Co. in Chicago, not only giving access to the most attractive jazz repertoire of the period, but also enabling the company to import electric record players from the USA.

 

1928

Beethoven´s Missa Solemnis (Berlin Philharmonic, Bruno Kittel) is recorded in its entirety on eleven 30 cm diameter discs. At Christmas a million copies of a 30 cm disc of the “Archangel Gabriel proclaiming the birth of Christ to the shepherds” are sold – an unheard-of success!

In Tokyo Nippon Polydor Chikounki K. K. is founded.

 

1929

Emil Berliner dies in Washington on August 3.

Victor Talking Machine Co. sells all rights and labels acquired from Berliner to RCA.

Under the direction of Herbert Borchardt and Erna Elchlepp, the Societée Phonographique Française Polydor S. A. is founded. Mr. König is instated as the recording engineer in Paris.

At this time the daily output of records in Hannover climbs to 83,000 copies from among a total production of 10 million discs.

DG AG takes an interest in KLANGFILM GmbH, expecting future benefits for their recording business, but due to a negative prognosis they already give up their shares in 1932.

During the twenties, the board of directors at DG AG consists of Dr. Gustav Stresemann, former Imperial Chancellor Fehrenbach, former Imperial Minister of Trade and Commerce Dr. von Raumer, Cyrus Thomas Pott (Union Corp., London), Gerrit Kreyenbroek (Teixeira, Amsterdam), Dr. Curt Sobernheim (Kommerz & Privatbank AG), Hans Arnhold (Gebr. Arnhold, Dresden/Berlin) and Martin Schiff.

 

1930

Due to the World Economic Crisis, which had already made itself felt in 1929, the company´s extensive foreign activities are concentrated in March in a Swiss holding, the Polyphon-Holding AG. In 1932 this holding is renamed Polydor Holding AG.

 

1932

On account of the catastrophic stagnation of the business in their plant, Polyphon Werke AG, Leipzig, merges with Deutschen Grammophon AG, soon to be followed by the total shutdown of the production in Leipzig.

Due to heavy traffic noise, the recording studios are moved from Markgrafenstraße to Lützowstraße 111/112.

 

1933

Deutsche Grammophon AG parts company with Polydor Holding, Basel, selling off all their shares in it.

Under pressure from international copyright companies and technical innovations, such as broadcasting, technical setups for large events, the sound film, later also tape recorders, the record companies form a protective association, the “International Federation of the Phonographic Industry” (IFPI), which soon gains considerable influence. Dr. Walter Betcke, manager at DGG, is its president from 1961 to 1964 (at a much later stage).

 

1934

Due to the depression the prestigious premises in Berlin, Markgrafenstraße, are abandoned in favor of modest offices in Jerusalemer Straße 65-66.

 

1936

Duhme and A. Schaaf (DGG) provide the first systematic classification and quantitative analysis of record noises.

 

1937

DGG´s principal shareholders emigrate to escape growing racial defamation, trying to sell their shares. An interim board of directors manages to bring about a capital merger as a first step towards recovery and enables a consortium of Deutsche Bank and Telefunken Gesellschaft für drahtlose Telegraphie mbH to start a re-development programme by liquidating DG AG and by founding Deutsche Grammophon GmbH. Telefunken is interested in this new company because their own Telefunken Platte GmbH, founded in 1932, has no production plant. This cooperation prepares the subsequent re-emergence of DGG mbH, too, especially by adding to it the total production of Telefunken Platte in Hannover. This means that the ultra-modern Telefunken recording technology is there to be shared insofar as it is not curtailed by temporary deficits.

 

1938

Measures to rebuild Berlin (by Albert Speer, among others) induce DG AG to abandon its studios on Lützowstraße 111/112, and to move to the former Zentraltheater in the Alte Jakobstraße. Much better acoustic and technical conditions than in their previous location make up for this change, initially seen as a form of humiliation. This is where a new high-class repertoire is recorded with works played by BPO and the State Opera Orchestra. The number of conductors already under contract (Paul van Kempen, Carl Schuricht, Richard Strauss) is joined by young Herbert von Karajan, who produces his first recordings ever in the new studio. Soloists performing there are Wilhelm Kempff, Elly Ney, Alfred Sittard, Georg Kulenkampff, Erna Berger, Tiana Lemnitz, Viorica Ursuleac, Walther Ludwig, Julius Patzak, Helge Roswaenge, Heinrich Schlusnus, Franz Völker, and others.

These top-flight productions are traded under the label „Grammophon Meisterklasse“.

DGG´s headquarters are soon transferred to larger rooms in the Ringbahnstraße 63 in Berlin-Tempelhof.

 

1941

A major contract between Siemens and AEG assigns all Telefunken shares to AEG, and all DG shares to Siemens, thereby turning Siemens into the sole proprietor of DGG, a move which proves to introduce one of the most successful periods in company history. Dr. Ernst von Siemens and board director Dr. Adolf Lohse subsequently take an avid interest in everything that happens at DGG.

The unabbreviated “St Matthew´s Passion” appears on eighteen 30 cm discs right in the middle of the war, their matrices carried to Japan by a blockade-runner submarine. Until the end of the war, 17,000 copies are sold in Japan.

 

1942

At DGG Dr. Emil Duhme (Siemens) introduces vacuum silvering to replace electro silvering. Following the recommendation of Hans Domizlaff, Siemens' advisor on matters of style and labels, all records produced in this way are given new imprints:

 

1943

Classical music gets pale blue labels, called Siemens Spezial (experimental record, using the new silvering process of the electro-acoustic research lab; light music is given a red label, Siemens Polydor (produced by electro-acoustic methods meant to provide a high degree of purity of sound and an extended frequency response.

Several top-flight productions, such as Beethoven´s 7th Symphony (State Opera Orchestra Berlin, Karajan) and Don Quixote by and under Richard Strauss, Bavarian State Orchestra, are produced in this manner.

On January 1, Siemens sends qualified engineer Helmut Haertel to DGG to become their deputy manager.

The Berlin studio and large sections of the Hannover plant fall victim to bombing during the last years of the war. Haertel and Blanke organize the work of rebuilding them, so that a makeshift production can soon be resumed by using a number of presses that had remained intact somehow.

 

1945

The British Occupying Council authorizes DGG to employ 50 extra staff for cleaning-up operation. First stopgap earnings are made by direct sale to members of the occupation army. Together with engineer Thieme (Siemens, Hannover), P. K. Burkowitz, newly assigned to the electro-acoustic lab on August 16, 1945 for a wage of 50,- Reichsmark per month (a mere pocketmoney), starts building a makeshift mixing desk to enable the company to record music again. The desk, resembling V35 of RGG, is finished early in 1946, relying on available components, like shielded cables, which have to be extricated at night from deserted flak shelters.

The first recordings are made on magnetic audio tape (German: "Magnetophonband") at the Capitol in Hannover in October.

Heinrich Keilholz contributes his extensive recording experience, which he gathered during his years at RGG (Reichsrundfunkgesellschaft), by taking up the position of head of the recording department at DGG. He will hold the position until 1960.

 

1946

In May, G. Schöttler and A. Schaaf (DGG) introduce their version of extended play (modulation-controlled groove distance, patented on December 28, 1948).

Using the new makeshift mixing desk (3 channel controls, 1 ouput control, level indicator with 10 ms attack time on a 40 dB scale) and two miraculously preserved Neumann “bottles” (a pressure gradient capsule and an M7), he makes his first recordings at the Beethoven Hall in Hannover, and he is quite happy with the result.

When the ban on travelling is lifted, Burkowitz returns to his hometown Berlin on August 31 to work for RIAS as sound engineer. His main contacts there are: Albert Pösniker (Technical Director), Otto Scheffler and Jörg Hinkel (technical development and construction), Prof. Elsa Schiller (head of the classics department), Fried Walter and Hans Carste (heads of the light music department), Werner Müller (conductor of the dance music orchestra), Heinz Opitz, Fritz Ribbentrop, Alfred Schmidt, Helmut Hertlein and Helmut Krüger (sound engineers).

At DGG Biers and A. Schaaf start using pressing materials without any filling or grinding additives.

From this time onwards, DGG produces all its recordings by using magnetic tape (the first post-war models from AEG).

 

1948

The logo “His Master´s Voice”, no longer serviceable in international business, is sold to the previous owner, The Gramophone Co and its German subsidiary Electrola.

Musicologist Dr. Fred Hamel starts building his Archiv Produktion, which will soon gain worldwide attention and fame.

In the USA rival Columbia introduces its first 30 cm 33⅓ rpm longplay records in vinyl. This leads to a format competition with RCA, pinning its hopes on a 17 cm, 45 rpm model.

 

1949

The combination of the company logo Siemens and the record labels, recognized as unsuitable, is abandoned. Following Domizlaff´s suggestion, two new labels are introduced: the yellow label Deutsche Grammophon Gesellschaft for classical music and the red label Polydor for light music.

 

1950

Dr. Hans-Werner Steinhausen from Telefunken-Platte GmbH becomes managing director of the technical department of DGG.

The production of light music is transferred from Hannover to Hamburg, where it resides on the premises of Studio Hamburg GmbH, with Alfred Schmidt as head of the light music recording activities.

DGG makes its first stereo tape recordings for comparative tests, also testing their usefulness on records.

 

1951

In the meantime the company has managed to gain the cooperation of the following artists: Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau, Christel Goltz, Josef Greindl, Elisabeth Höngen, Annelies Kupper, Fritz Lehmann, Wilma Lipp, Max Lorenz, Enrico Meinardi, Wolfgang Schneiderhan, Irmgard Seefried, Carl Seemann, Elfriede Trötschel, Hermann Uhde, Wolfgang Windgassen, Wilhelm Kempff, Leopold Ludwig, and Walther Ludwig.

The new synthetic LP with 33⅓ rpm is now marketable in Germany, too.

Twelve new yellow-label releases create quite a stir at the Funkausstellung on account of their superlative quality and the placement of items like Mendelssohn´s A Midsummer Night´s Dream (Berlin PO, Fricsay), Brahms´ 2nd Symphony (Berlin PO, Jochum), Mozart´s Eine kleine Nachtmusik (Chamber Orchestra of the Bavarian Broadcast, Jochum), Brahms´ Variations on a Theme by Haydn, op. 56 (Württembergisches Staatsorchester Stuttgart, Leitner) – on just one side of an LP!

 

1952

Prof. Elsa Schiller, former head of the music department at RIAS, Berlin, is made product manager for classical music at DGG.

The first complete opera recorded on LP is Lortzing´s “Zar und Zimmermann”, prelude to a long line of such recordings with the yellow label.

Kurt Richter is made head of the light music department.

Heinrich Keilholz, head of the DGG recording department, provides new decorative acoustic elements for the Vienna State Opera, which are highly effective.

 

1953

Dr. Ernst von Siemens is made head of the supervisory board at DGG.

The 17 cm 45 rpm is now introduced throughout the music industry.

 

1954

DGG establishes a subsidiary in London, Polydor UK, Ltd.. Werner Riemer is made its managing director, formerly export division Hannover.

For the first time DGG records a complete work of literature: Goethe´s Faust on LP.

84 % of all deliveries are still 78 shellac discs.

The plant in Hannover is enlarged by 1,000 sqm.

 

1956

The headquarters and the managing board of DGG are transferred from Hannover to Hamburg.

 

1957

The construction works for a new record manufacturing plant are started in Langenhagen near Hannover.

After great success of Goethe´s “Faust I” (Düsseldorf, Gründgens), the „Literary Archive“ (green label) if founded. Dr. Adolf Lohse, member of the board of directors, will take care for this label in the future.

 

1958

DGG releases its first stereo LP record, although already at the industry´s disposal since 1954. Due to the progressive pick-up technology, stereo LPs can be submitted to public use earlier than imagined because they are “mono compatible” (they can also be played on mono sets).

The production of shellac discs is abandoned. The vinyl formats – 33⅓ rpm LPs and 45 rpm singles – are firmly established by this time.

 

1959

Herbert von Karajan is once more taken under a long-term contract by DGG.

The moulding record production starts in Langenhagen, next to the site of the future Emil Berliner Studios. At first the daily output is 40,000 discs, soon to surpass 120,000 ones.

 

1960

The size of the DGG catalogues, containing more than 5,000 titles by renowned artists, achieves a new top position in the music industry worldwide.

The recording department with its studios is physically separated and moved back to Podbielskistraße in Hanover, the production is continued in Hamburg.

 

1961

Dr. W. Betcke, managing director at DGG, is elected president of IFPI for one term of tenure.

Horst Söding, head of the development department at DGG, introduces the first experimental video disc (for internal use only).

 

1962

Siemens AG, München, and Philips Gloeilampen Fabrieken N. V., Eindhoven/Netherlands, decide to merge their subsidiaries DGG und PPI (Philips Phonographische Industrie) ecenomically while both maintaining legally independent. They believe in considerable advantages from this move, DGG having a superlative repertoire, PPI owning branches worldwide. The new company trades under the provisional name “GPG” (in Germany Grammophon-Philips-Gruppe, in Netherlands Gruppe Philips Grammophon). Coen Solleveld is elected president, F & A Johannes van der Velden, Distribution & Sales Kurt Kinkele, Engineering Dr. H. W. Steinhausen, Polydor Int. Dr. Werner Vogelsang, PPI Piet Schellevis, DGG Richard Busch, Philips Reinhard Klaassen.

The group acquires the company and label Mercury (US).

At GPG Hannover Immelmann introduces a fully automatic electronic record control system.

 

1964

At the end of his tenure, Dr. W. Betcke surrenders his IFPI chairmanship to Richard Dawes, EMI.

 

1965

The production of music cassettes (MC) begins in Hannover.

 

1967

Peter K. Burkowitz is made head of Groups Recording Management (GRM) in Hannover, alternatively in Baarn, Netherlands. Technical planning, construction and service capacities are distributed to both facilities, depending on demand and suitability. Coordinating measures are to be initiated on all decision levels. The studios of regional branches are supervised centrally, introducing adequate measures of standardization, modernization and coordination.

There are exploratory talks with Dr. Steinhausen on the transfer of the sound engineering department from Hannover to Langenhagen into a new, yet to be built administrative center. The favored solution of a separate building, especially appropriate for acoustic reasons (close proximity to the highway), cannot be verified, owing to limited resources, but it is not rejected altogether, either.

 

1969

The recording department sound engineering and GRM move to Langenhagen into the new administrative building.

C. Olms, head of Polydor studios, London, describes the principles and solutions of automatic repetition of work routines at the mixing desk.

During a US tour P. K. Burkowitz scouts out halls, studios and recording installation of the most renowned labels in New York, Chicago, Montreal, Detroit, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Cleveland, Cincinnati, Nashville, Memphis, Boston, San Francisco, and Los Angeles. The news of an expiring contract between the Boston Symphony Orchestra and RCA, immediately transferred to Kurt Kinkele in Hamburg, initiates a new long-term contract between DGG and the BSO, leading to the establishment of a separate control room for DGG (a novelty in the Symphony Hall), with a modern analog transistor desk from the GPG workshop, audio engineering department Baarn. Local supervision in Boston is assigned to Paul Meister, GPG audio engineering department, Hannover (see picture below).

 

1970

First 4 channel quadrophony discs.

In the Netherlands the first worldwide meeting of Group Recording Managers (heads of regional companies) is arranged. Many participants see their colleagues from other countries for the first time ever. A great need for and real interest in timely technical information becomes apparent, leading to a regular service, including suggestions for practical and economically viable harmonization measures.

 

1971

Siemens and Philips assign GPG to PolyGram.

After many years of international groundwork by Johann L. Ooms (former chief engineer for electro acoustics at PPI) and regional initiatives by P. K. Burkowitz and several technical heads of European companies inside the music industry, there is a first meeting of the Audio Engineering Society (AES) in Europe, convening in Cologne. This event marks the beginnings of a new (and badly needed) international cooperation, providing information on and accounts of experiences with technological inventions. Burkowitz heads the first three meetings: 1971 in Cologne, 1972 in Munich, and 1973 in Rotterdam (see AES History: Background Information – AES Amsterdam 2008 (April 2, 2008)).

On February 8, 1971 the control room at the Boston Symphony Hall is officially opened in the presence of journalists:

 

1972

The classics teams of DGG and Philips (PolyGram) are now serially equipped with 8-channel, soon even 16-channel machines (Studer).

 

1976

The first digital test recordings are made with Sony PCM1 machines. At the same time, everything is still recorded on analogue tape as well.

 

1977

Lothar Schmidt und Gorski, POLYGRAM-AED Hannover, create the first automatic mixing system with inter-track data recording and real-time data recovery.

DECCA London builds proprietary digital tape recorders in their own workshop.

 

1979

PolyGram quickly equips classical music teams and national companies with commercially available digital tape machines and systematically begins the transition to digital recording: Sony PCM 1600 for stereo recordings, 3M and SONY 3324 multitrack machines for multitrack recordings .

 

1980

Under the overall technical supervision of Dr. Hermann R. Franz, PolyGram engineers (production technology - Dieter Soiné, development department - Horst Söding) develop the entire technology of CD record production, based on their own experiences from Hanover laboratories dating back to 1961. The market is supplied from 1982.

 

1981

DGG Tonmeister Karl-August Naegler receives a Grammy Award for his recording of Alban Berg´s Lulu (Orchestre de l'Opéra de Paris, Pierre Boulez) in the category „Best Engineered Album, Classical“.

 

1983

Nach Erreichen des Ruhestandalters und einem weiteren Jahr Beratertätigkeit übergibt Peter K. Burkowitz seinen betrieblichen Aufgabenbereich an Prof. Dr. Hans Hirsch (Chef E-Musik DGG) und seinen technischen Aufgabenbereich an Ing. Han Tendeloo (Chef Group-Adva). Die Leitung des DGG-Aufnahme-Bereichs übernimmt Klaus Hiemann.

 

1984

The first CD-ROMs (reald-only memory) are produced in Hannover.

 

1985

A six-year cooperation between Philips and Dupont Optical begins under the logo PDO.

 

1986

digital delay technology is used for the first time to compensate for time differences between main and spot microphones.

 

1987

The CD-Video with analog picture and digital sound is created.

During the Funkausstellung P. K. Burkowitz, invited for this purpose, explains to interested visitors the principles of recording in the “digital era”. This is followed by an exchange of ideas with Oliver Berliner about the situation and plans of the descendants of Emil Berliner and his views on subsequent developments (see the following pictures).

 

1989

The bit rate for two-channel recordings is increased from 16 to 24 bits.

 

1990

Development of High Capacity Discs (forerunners of the DVD).

 

1991

The remaining production facilities are transferred from Hannover, Podbielskistraße, to Langenhagen.

The first recordings in “4D” technology are carried out, with A/D conversion as close to the microphone as possible, so that only digital signals are carried to the mixing desk via cable. (Resolution during both the recording and the mixing process should exceed the CD standard).

DG producer Hans Weber receives a Grammy Award for his recording of Charles Ives' orchestra works (New York Philharmonic, Leonard Bernstein) in the category „Best Classical Album“. Tonmeister was Klaus Scheibe.

 

1992

DG Tonmeister Gregor Zielinsky receives a Grammy Award for his recording of Leonard Bernstein´s Candide (London Symphony Orchestra, Bernstein) in the category „Best Engineered Album, Classical“.

 

1993

Patenting of the CD recycling technology, a PolyGram Hannover product.

For 2 and 4-track recordings, the resolution is increased from 16 bits to 24 bits (Nagra-D).

 

1994

24-bit technology is also introduced for multi-track recordings (> 4 tracks). For this purpose, the DASH machines (Sony) are modified by the in-house audio engineering department under the direction of Stefan Shibata.

The PolyGram plant Hannover/Langenhagen is renamed PolyGram Manufacturing & Distribution Centres GmbH (PMDC).

DG Tonmeister Rainer Maillard receives a Grammy Award for his recording of Bartók´s The Wooden Prince and Cantata Profana (Chicago Symphony Orchestra, & Chorus, Pierre Boulez) in the category „Best Engineered Album, Classical“.

 

1995

The first functional high-capacity discs are released.

 

1996

The favorable business prospects and the closure of the administrative building in Langenhagen enable Klaus Hiemann to realize the old plan of building a separate accomodation for recording purposes, and also to give it a truly appropriate name, independent from any commercial ups and downs: The Emil Berliner House. After its completion the recording centre of PolyGram Hannover moves into the new building on the company premises in Langenhagen. It is on the ground level throughout. Oliver Berliner is present at the official opening ceremony. Also the street in front of the Langenhagen premises is renamed, so there is now an official Emil-Berliner-Straße in Hannover.

PolyGram Hannover exceeds the mark of one billion CDs.

Production of DVDs with a memory capacity of 7 CD-ROMs (DVD-5).

 

1998

Celebration of “100 years of record technology”.

Seagram (US) acquires the PolyGram shares from Philips and integrates them into its global enterprise, creating the world´s biggest music company inside this new holding.

The DVD-9 (equaling 13 CD-ROMs) is now produced serially.

The first recordings at 96 kHz sampling frequency are produced in the Emil Berliner House.

 

1999

PMDC is renamed Universal Manufacturing & Logistics GmbH (UML). PolyGram Recording Services (PRS) are dubbed Universal Recording Services (URS).

The repertoire is digitalized for the purposes of electronic commerce.

During a URS recording session with Max Raabe and his Palast Orchester (see picture below) both modern condenser microphones and a historic Reisz microphone from the late 1920 are used, the latter borrowed from the museum of Georg Neumann GmbH, restored by Manfred Hibbing (Sennheiser electronic).

 

2000

Emil Berliner Studios is now the name for all services of the previous Recording Centre, such as implementation of recording sessions, recording practice and technology, mastering of tapes and the keeping of archives.

As part of the Cannes Classical Awards, Klaus Hiemann is awarded The Emile Berliner Memorial Award for Lifetime Achievement.

The French company Vivendi merges with Universal Music to form Vivendi-Universal.

 

2001

January: Since the end of 1996, more than 5 million DVDs have been produced.

The first DVD-Audio is made at the Emil Berliner Studios, but the first products are released not until 2003 (see examples below).

 

2002/ 2003

The department Media Authoring is a new addition to the existing services of EBS, devoted to authoring the new sound carrier formats DVD-Audio and Super Audio CD. It provides pioneer work and is subsequently complemented by the screen picture, together with the DVD-Video.

Much ado about nothing: The experts and parts of the Hi-Fi/High End scene are at cross purposes over the new recording format DSD, on which the Super Audio CD is based, and possible advantages of this format in comparison to PCM, as it is used for CD and (in its high-resolution variety) for DVD-Audio, the rival format of SACD. Whereas the discussion is marred by the use of unsuitable comparisons and untenable marketing slogans, EBS really undertakes to compare the formats. They are the first (and perhaps the only) team worldwide to do so. During the recording of Mahler´s 2nd Symphony (Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, Gilbert Kaplan, released on Deutsche Grammophon CD 474 380-2, SACD 477 594-2) in the Musikvereinssaal, Vienna, the whole recording sequence is carried out by using both PCM and DSD technology following the microphone. To exclude sound variations by different A/D converters, the team uses special converters capable of dealing with both formats. The result of the subsequent listening comparisons by double-blind test is as straight-forward as sobering: There is no difference whatsoever.

 

2005

The Universal-owned plant for optical data carriers on the premises in Hannover/Langenhagen is sold to the American company Entertainment Distribution Company (EDC).

 

2007

Deutsche Grammophon/Universal gives up large portions of its company-owned Emil Berliner Studios for “strategic reasons”. The departments Mastering and Media Authoring are closed down. They carry on as independent companies, managed by their respective executives (Eastside Mastering Studios Berlin GmbH headed by Götz-Michael Rieth and Dirk Niemeier, platin media productions GmbH & Co. KG headed by Harald Gericke). By this time, the extensive company archive has already been disincorporated into a separate branch. Only the recording crew remains, still carrying out assignments for DG and DECCA.

 

2008

By way of a management buy-out Emil Berliner Studios – Deutsche Grammophon GmbH turns into the new independent company EBS Productions GmbH & Co. KG, carrying on under the Emil Berliner Studios with more or less the same crew. In the meantime Hannover/Langenhagen is getting emptier by the day: All tape archive stock is transferred to Arvato Digital Services (previously Sonopress) in Gütersloh, Westfalia.

 

2009

The management of EBS decides to leave Hannover/Langenhagen and to move to Berlin. The premises there in the Köthener Straße 38, close to the Potsdamer Platz, still house the historic Meistersaal and various other companies from the section “media production”. The studios are rebuilt completely, which takes as much as nine months to be completed.

At the same time overdub recordings for actor Ulrich Tukur´s album “Mezzanotte” are underway in the studios in Hannover/Langenhagen, the last recording sessions at the old address.

 

2010

EBS leaves the location Hannover/Langenhagen and moves to Berlin. On October 21 the crew celebrates the start into a new and hopeful era of its outstanding and complex history.

 

Note

The author does not guarantee the correctness of calendar data, as the figures in the sources do not always match.

© 2010 Peter K. Burkowitz †

Additions since 1983 and editing for web presentation: © 2013 Daniel Kemper

We would like to thank Mrs A. Panczel-Lenke for translating this historical survey into English.

Revisions & supplements: © 2020 Rainer Maillard

Revisions & supplements translation: Sidney Claire Meyer

 

Sources (Peter K. Burkowitz)

  • Private notes, researches, memories
  • Corp. membership: DGG 1945 - 1946, RIAS 1946 - 1953, EMI 1953 - 1967, PolyGram 1967 - 1983.
  • Oliver Read, Walter L. Welch: „From Tin Foil to Stereo“; Howard W. Sams & Co., Inc.; The Bobbs-Merrill Co., Inc., 2nd edition, Indianapolis, USA. ISBN: 0-672-21505-6
  • DGG prints, among others „65 Jahre Deutsche Grammophon Gesellschaft, 1898 - 1963“, „100 Jahre Schallplatte“ – von Hannover in die Welt (P. Becker, O. Heyne, U. Lencher, J. Popp, K. Schäfer, P. Schulze, D. Tasch, W. Zahn, F. R. Zankl).
  • Bruch, Walter „Von der Tonwalze zur Bildplatte“, offprint from the Funkschau, Franzis Verlag München
  • Internet, div., e. g. Nipper vor dem Trichter (DIE ZEIT, 2001)
  • DVD booklet „Emil Berliner – Von der Schellackplatte bis zur DVD“, Emil Berliner Studios, May 20, 2001
  • Report from Walter Schindler (emplyed in Berlin 1926, transferred to Hannover in 1949, retired in 1962), based on a MC recording from September 29, 1976 and conversations from November 5, 1981 and February 21, 1983, summarized in 1982/83 by Ernst Kwoll
  • Informations from Lester Smith, Abbey Road Studios
  • The Gramophone Archive (Internet)
  • Martland, Peter: „Since records began: EMI – The first hundred years“. EMI-Group plc. 1997, Amadeus Press, ISBN 1-57467-033-6

 

Sources (R. Maillard)

  • Edwin Hein: „Ein Name macht Geschichte", manuscript, Museum für Energie Geschichte(n), Hanover
  • Correspondence between Helmut Haertel & Hugo Wünsch 1945-1946, historic folders DGG, Museum für Energie Geschichte(n), Hanover
  • Pensioner interviews (German: "Pensionärsgespräche") 1956 & 1957, tape recordings, DGG tape archive

 

Do you have any comments, criticism or additions? Please write to us. We are looking for further sources and documents about the history of our recording studio.

Erna Elchlepps Leben bei der Deutschen Grammophon - von Dr. Eva Zöllner
Erna Elchlepp

Foto aus Privatbesitz, mit freundlicher Genehmigung

»Ich würde alles genau wieder so machen!«

Die Geschichte der Tontechnik, der Schallplatte und ihrer Verbreitung lässt sich auf vielerlei Arten erzählen, ganz abhängig davon, welche Aspekte man in der Vordergrund der Betrachtungen stellt: technische, zeit- oder industriegeschichtliche. Sie lässt sich aber auch aus der persönlichen Warte einer Frau zeigen, die diese Entwicklung hautnah miterlebte: Erna Elchlepp wirkte den größten Teil ihres Berufslebens als leitende Angestellte, Produzentin und Leiterin der »Künstlerabteilung« bei der Deutschen Grammophon in Berlin, in Paris und in Hannover. Von etwa 1920 bis in die 1960er Jahre hinein war sie Zeitzeugin der revolutionären technischen Umwälzungen und kleinen Veränderungen, die sich auf diesem Gebiet im Laufe der Jahrzehnte vollzogen. Sie erlebte die »Roaring Twenties«, die Weltwirtschaftskrise, den Zweiten Weltkrieg, Wiederaufbau und Wirtschaftswunder im Zeichen der Aufnahmetechnik und der Schallplatte. Und mit ihrer Tatkraft und ihrem Durchsetzungswillen, aber auch mit Zugewandtheit und großer Loyalität war sie eine fachliche und menschliche Instanz, die Freunde, Familienmitglieder und Kollegen ebenso liebe- wie respektvoll schlicht »Tante Erna« nannten.

Erna Elchlepp wurde am 5. August 1887 in Zittau als Tochter des Textil-Kaufmanns Theodor Elchlepp und seiner Frau Minna geboren. Um 1900, Erna Elchlepp war 12 Jahre alt,[1] übersiedelte die Familie endgültig nach Berlin.[2]  Der Wunsch nach Unabhängigkeit regte sich in Erna Elchlepp offenbar schon früh: Mit 16 Jahren, direkt nach ihrem Schulabschluss,[3] überraschte sie ihre Eltern mit dem für die damalige Zeit äußerst ungewöhnlichen Wunsch, für ein Jahr nach Frankreich gehen zu dürfen, um die Landessprache vor Ort zu lernen.[4] Ihre Familie stand dem Gedanken der beruflichen Selbständigkeit ihrer Tochter aufgeschlossen gegenüber, der Vater entsprach ihrem Wunsch und arrangierte einen Austausch mit einem jungen Franzosen.

Kurz nach Erna Elchlepps Rückkehr nach Berlin schloss sich ein Auslandsjahr in England an: Eine Privatschule in Ventnor auf der Isle of Wight hatte sie als Französischlehrerin verpflichtet. Dort hielt es Erna allerdings nicht lange: Sie wollte lieber ihre englischen Sprachkenntnisse verbessern und suchte nach nur einem Vierteljahr daher eine Anstellung als Gesellschafterin bei einer Dame. Danach ging es zurück nach Berlin; nach einem Jahr an einer dortigen Handelsschule[5] schloss sie ihre Ausbildung ab und startete mit Anfang 20 direkt ins Berufsleben.

Mit dieser Ausbildung hatte Erna Elchlepp die einer Frau zu jener Zeit zur Verfügung stehenden Bildungsmöglichkeiten bestmöglich genutzt; um 1905, als sie die Schule verließ, war der Besuch der Gymnasialstufe noch immer fast ausschließlich jungen Männern vorbehalten. Erst 1896, nur 9 Jahre zuvor, hatte man in Berlin 6 (in Worten: sechs) extern vorbereitete Frauen zur Abiturprüfung zugelassen, erst ab 1908 konnten sich Frauen an preußischen Universitäten immatrikulieren.[6]

Die Anfänge von Erna Elchlepps Berufsleben gestalteten sich zunächst vergleichsweise unspektakulär: Ihre erste Anstellung fand sie bei der »Deutschen Dental-Gesellschaft Erhard Zacharias« in Berlin-Mitte,[7] für die sie die englischsprachige Korrespondenz besorgte. Die Gesellschaft lieferte Ausrüstung und Ausstattung für Zahnarztpraxen und pflegte auch internationale Geschäftsbeziehungen, vor allem mit den Vereinigten Staaten.

Wenige Jahre später brach der Erste Weltkrieg aus, der auf seine Weise auch Konsequenzen für Erna an der »Heimatfront« hatte: Da der Inhaber der Gesellschaft 1914 einberufen wurde,[8] übernahm sie zusammen mit einer Kollegin, einer Frau Warsany, die Leitung der Firma. Dem betagten Buchhalter des Hauses, »ein alter beinbehinderter Mann, der jähzornig wurde, wenn man ihn störte und die Bücher zur Erde warf«[9] schmeckte es offenbar wenig, Weisungen von einer weiblichen Führungsriege entgegenzunehmen. Erna Elchlepp selbst war sich dessen bewusst, wie außergewöhnlich ihre berufliche Situation war: »Sie müssen berücksichtigen, dass in meiner Jugend eine Frau in leitender Position eine ganz große Ausnahme war!«, so erzählte sie noch als 90jährige voller Stolz ihrer Interviewpartnerin.[10] Ob sie die neue Verantwortung schreckte, ist nicht überliefert; ihr späterer Werdegang lässt aber vermuten, dass sie die neue Aufgabe eher als Herausforderung betrachtete – und begrüßte.

Anzeige aus: »Schulzahnpflege. Monatsschrift des Deutschen Zentral-Komitees für Zahnpflege in den Schulen.«

Berlin, Juli 1910

Im letzten Kriegsjahr begann ein neues Kapitel in Erna Elchlepps Leben, sowohl beruflich wie privat: Im Januar 1918 wurde die Deutsche Dental-Gesellschaft abgewickelt,[11] im Oktober, wenige Wochen vor Kriegsende, starb ihr Vater (die Mutter war bereits 1915 verstorben). Damit begann für sie und ihren zwei Jahre jüngeren Bruder Walter ein neuer Lebensabschnitt. Erna Elchlepp, nunmehr Anfang 30, stand vor einem beruflichen Neubeginn. Auf der Suche nach einer neuen Firma mit internationalen Beziehungen, bei der sie ihre Sprachkenntnisse gewinnbringend einsetzen konnte, stieß sie 1919 schließlich auf eine Anzeige der Deutschen Grammophon: Eine Fremdsprachen-Korrespondentin für Englisch und Französisch wurde gesucht. Erna bewarb sich und wurde zum 1. Oktober 1919 eingestellt.  Und so begann ihre ebenso lange wie außergewöhnliche Karriere in der Schallplattenbranche.

Erna Elchlepp kam in die zu dieser Zeit etwa 50 Mitarbeiter zählende Exportabteilung der Deutschen Grammophon in der Berliner Hauptverwaltung an der Markgrafenstraße 76, wo sie zunächst »ziemlich verloren in einem großen Raum Karteiarbeiten an noch vorsintflutlichen Stehpulten« erledigte. Doch das änderte sich rasch: Nach ein paar Monaten übernahm Fritz Schönheimer (1895–1975), der fast zeitgleich mit ihr eingestellt worden war, den Posten des Exportleiters und Erna Elchlepp wurde ihm als seine rechte Hand zugeteilt.[12] Das Auslandsgeschäft belebte sich und »bald war der ehemals große leere Raum mit fleißigen Stenotypistinnen bevölkert, die, da jede ihr besonderes Arbeitsgebiet hatte, miteinander wetteifernd morgens nach der Postverteilung eiligst feststellten, wer den größten Auftragseingang hatte«.[13]

Zu den Aufgaben der Exportabteilung gehörte es, für die umfangreichen reisetechnischen Belange der Aufnahmeexpeditionen zu sorgen, die in alle Herren Länder führten:

 

»Die Aufnahmen erfolgten auf Wachsplatten und mit Trichter. Außer den Wachsplatten, die in großen mit Zink beschlagenen Kisten stoß- und vor Feuchtigkeit sicher verpackt wurden, war ein sogenannter Wärmeschrank zum Anwärmen der Wachsplatten erforderlich. Der Aufnahmeingenieur, das war entweder Herr Blaesche, Herr Ehrich oder Herr Goile, zog also mit ziemlich umfangreichen Gepäck – ca. 10 große Kisten und Koffer – los. [...] Wir waren immer heilfroh, wenn die bespielten Wachse ohne viel Bruch zur Entwicklung in Hannover angelangt waren.«[14]

 

Es ließ sich bei der Deutschen Grammophon als Angestellter trotz der galoppierenden Inflation zu Beginn der 1920er Jahre offenbar gut aushalten:

 

»Ganz allgemein herrschte im Betrieb ein gutes Arbeitsklima. Zusätzlich zu den durchaus angemessenen Gehältern erhielt jeder Mitarbeiter zu Weihnachten ein volles Monatsgehalt und zum Abschluß des Geschäftsjahres nochmals ein Monatsgehalt als Prämie. Die Zahlung von 14 Monatsgehältern war in damaliger Zeit keineswegs üblich. Außerdem wurde für nur wenige Pfennige ein ausgezeichnetes Mittagessen verabreicht. Traditionsgemäß veranstaltete man auch in jedem Sommer einen ganztägigen Betriebsausflug, der in Berlin zu der bekannten Woltersdorfer Schleuse führte. In den Inflationsjahren lief, wenn auch mit temporären Schwankungen, die deutsche Wirtschaft überall auf Hochtouren; es wurde gut verdient.«[15]

 

Eines der wenigen erhaltenen Fotos der Belegschaft aus den 1920er Jahren zeigt diese bei einem Betriebsausflug 1921 (zur erwähnten Woltersdorfer Schleuse?).

Betriebsausflug der Berliner Belegschaft der Deutschen Grammophon, 1921

EDC Hannover, mit freundlicher Genehmigung des kreHtiv Netzwerks Hannover

Auf einem weiteren Bild aus den frühen 1920er Jahren sind einige Mitglieder der Direktion der Deutschen Grammophon bei einem »Rokoko-Fest« in den Räumlichkeiten in der Markgrafenstraße 76 zu sehen, darunter Erna Elchlepp (mit Fächer), hinter ihr wahrscheinlich Fritz Schönheimer.

Rokoko-Fest in der Markgrafenstraße

DGG-Archiv

Die Zeiten waren gut, die Zukunft sah rosig aus – und das Betätigungsfeld von Erna Elchlepp erweiterte sich: 1926 erkrankte die Sekretärin des Generaldirektors Bruno Borchardt (1886–1940) und war für ein halbes Jahr freigestellt. Erna Elchlepp wurde gebeten, in dieser Zeit neben ihrer bisherigen Arbeit auch das Direktions-Sekretariat zu versehen. Die doppelte Tätigkeit erwies sich bald als aufreibend, doch Erna Elchlepp biss sich durch, in mehr als einer Hinsicht:

 

»Diese zusätzliche Belastung mag man mir manchmal angesehen haben und mein abgespanntes Aussehen war auch dem GD aufgefallen. Eines Tages beim Mittagessen in der Kantine kam der Küchenchef nachdem ich fertig gegessen hatte mit einer zweiten Portion Spinat und Ei, die es an diesem Tag gab. Auf meine Bemerkung, ich hätte doch meine Portion schon erhalten, sagte er: »Herr Generaldirektor hat angeordnet, dass Sie jetzt immer zwei Portionen erhalten!« Allgemeines unterdrücktes Lachen. Natürlich ging diese Geschichte wie ein Lauffeuer in der Firma um und am Nachmittag wurde, wie so oft schon, denn Herr Schönheimer hat viel ironischen Witz, mir durch das Fensterchen in unserer uns trennenden Glaswand (wir saßen Rücken gegen Rücken getrennt durch eine Holz-Glas-Wand) folgendes Zettelchen durchgesteckt: »Mit Speck fängt man Mäuse, mit Spinat und Ei Sekretärinnen!« Er hatte nur zu Recht, denn kurze Zeit darauf wurde ich vom GD gefragt, ob ich nicht das Sekretariat übernehmen möchte. Ich lehnte dies ab, war mir aber dabei bewusst, dass ich evtl. mit meiner Kündigung rechnen musste, weil meine Ablehnung den GD doch beleidigen musste. Aber siehe da, einige Tage später lag auf meinem Platz die Mitteilung, daß man mir die Handelsvollmacht erteilt habe, mit entsprechender Gehaltserhöhung!«[16]

Einkaufsabteilung in der Markgrafenstraße 76

c.1920 aus Max Chop: Der Konzern Polyphon-Grammophon 1920

Doch damit nicht genug: Als Fritz Schönheimer 1926 auf eine einjährige Weltreise ging (der 1928 eine zweite, kürzere folgte), »um das Exportgeschäft weiter auszubauen und angebahnte Verbindungen zum Abschluss zu bringen«,[17] führte Erna in seiner Abwesenheit die Exportabteilung allein.

Offensichtlich erledigte Erna Elchlepp ihre Pflichten zur großen Zufriedenheit der Direktion, denn 1929 betraute man sie mit einer noch größeren Aufgabe, dieses Mal in leitender Funktion: Sie wurde nach Paris entsandt, um die frisch gegründete »Société Phonographique Française Polydor« auf den Weg zu bringen, zusammen mit dem jungen Herbert Borchardt (1906–2000), einem Neffen des Generaldirektors Bruno Borchardt.

1924 hatte die Deutsche Grammophon für das Auslandsgeschäft die »Polydor« gegründet, da sie durch die Bestimmungen des Versailler Vertrags ihre alte Export-Marke »Die Stimme seines Herrn« nicht mehr verwenden durfte.[18] Den Vertrieb der Polydor-Schallplatten in Frankreich übertrug man der Pariser Vertretung der bekannten Instrumentenbaufirma Hohner/Trossingen,[19] die die Marke einführte.[20] Um den französischen Markt nachhaltiger erschließen zu können, wurde 1929 dann die »Société Phonographique Française Polydor« vor Ort etabliert.[21]

Für Erna Elchlepp war diese Beförderung eine große Auszeichnung, mit der aber ganz konkrete handfeste Aufbauarbeit einherging; es spricht für ihre Durchsetzungskraft und Hartnäckigkeit – man erinnere sich an ihre Leitung der Dentalgesellschaft zuvor –, dass sie die Aufgabe anpackte und sich von den vielen elementaren Schwierigkeiten, die in Paris aus dem Wege geräumt werden mussten, nicht entmutigen ließ. Und derer gab es viele, angefangen beim Firmengebäude selbst: Die Fabrik an der rue Jenner 6–8 im 13. Arrondissement, die man von der Papierfabrik Maunoury, Wolff & Cie.[22] übernommen hatte, war in einem schlimmen Zustand, die Stromversorgung mangelhaft:

 

»In Paris empfing mich in der rue Jenner eine concierge und ein verwahrlostes und schmutziges Fabrikgebäude. Ich ließ mir von der concierge einen Stuhl geben, der mitten im leeren Raum stand und so fing ich meine Tätigkeit an. Wir hatten in der ersten Zeit viele Schwierigkeiten, weil die Stromzuteilung nicht genügend war und bis eine größere Anlage hergestellt wurde, verging immerhin einige Zeit. So galt mein erster Blick, wenn ich morgens um die Ecke in die rue Jenner einbog, dem Schornstein, qualmte er nicht, dann lagen wir wieder einmal still und das bedeutete immer Lieferverzögerungen, die wir uns nicht leisten konnten.«

Im Polydor-Direktionsbüro, Paris, Mai 1929: Erna Elchlepp mit Herbert Borchardt (Mitte) sowie einem noch nicht identifizierten Kollegen (vermutlich Tonmeister Fritz König).

Foto aus Privatbesitz, mit freundlicher Genehmigung

Im laufenden Betrieb war technisches Knowhow gefragt, das man sich manchmal auf die Schnelle telefonisch aus Hannover holen musste:

 

»Auch allerhand technische Schwierigkeiten gab es und oft kam Meister Stieghahn verzweifelt ins Büro, er wisse sich nicht mehr zu helfen. Weder Herr Herbert Borchardt noch ich waren je in der Fabrik in Hannover gewesen, alle technischen Belange hatte ich mir von Herrn Bierwirth, der die Fabrik einrichtete, soweit als möglich erklären lassen und so mussten oft auftretende Fragen telefonisch mit Hannover geklärt werden.«

 

Die Anfänge waren nichts für schwache Nerven. Doch bald schon ging es voran, aus den ursprünglich 6 Pressen wurden 12[23] und es wurde fleißig weiter expandiert, nicht nur hinsichtlich des Umfangs der produzierten Auflagen, sondern auch baulich:

 

»Nachdem sich das Geschäft gut angelassen hatte, bekamen wir den Auftrag, auch ein Walzwerk und eine Galvanoplastik einzurichten und so entstand nebenbei der angrenzende Neubau. [24]Ein von der The Grammophon [sic] weg engagierte[r] Galvanikmeister brachte übrigens ein verkürztes Entwicklungsverfahren mit, das er auch in Hannover einführte.«[25]

 

Die Tätigkeit der Fabrik bleib auch der Nachbarschaft nicht verborgen: Der Inhaber eines kleinen Hotels an der Ecke, das Einzelzimmer vor allem an italienische Arbeiter vermietete, die tagsüber schliefen, legte Beschwerde ein. Die Erschütterungen waren tatsächlich »so stark, dass die Löffel auf den Kaffeetassen klapperten.« Man schuf mehr schlecht als recht Abhilfe mittels Filz- und Gummiunterlagen, erhielt aber dennoch eine Entschädigungsklage, die mit einem Vergleich endete.[26]

Es ging in Paris aber nicht nur um die physische Herstellung von Schallplatten, sondern auch um den Aufbau eines neuen, speziell auf den französischen Markt abgestimmten Repertoires, das sowohl Klassikliebhaber wie Fans der leichten Muse zufriedenstellen sollte; als Aufnahmeleiter wurde Fritz König für die Polydor abgestellt, der mit seiner Familie nach Paris übersiedelte.[27] Für das Klassikrepertoire stand Erna Elchlepp Albert Wolff (1884–1970) beratend zur Seite, der damalige Chefdirigent des Orchestre Lamoureux, für die leichte Muse beriet sie ein Kenner der Pariser Szene, Albert Olivier. Und so ging Erna Elchlepp zum Sondieren des passenden Repertoires und entsprechender Künstler bald bis »zum Überdruß in Filme, Kabaretts und Opernvorstellungen«.[28]

Die Schnelligkeit, mit der sich der Aufbau der Firma nebst Bauarbeiten, die Schallplatten-Produktion und die Aufnahmetätigkeit parallel miteinander entwickelten, war geradezu atemberaubend. Kaum war Elchlepp in Paris installiert, meldete Berlin schon Repertoirewünsche an:

 

»Wir waren noch nicht drei Monate ansässig, also noch in der Aufbauarbeit, als eines Tages Herr Wünsch mir telefonisch den Auftrag gab, so schnell als möglich zwei französische Kurzopernfassungen von Bohème und Carmen zu machen, sie hätten damit einen guten Erfolg, er schicke mir das Orchestermaterial und die zusammengestrichenen Stimmen. [...]  Wenn nicht Maître Wolf [...] gewesen wäre, [...] der das Orchester, den Chor, die Kopisten etc. zur Hand  hatte, wäre die Durchführung einer solchen Aufnahme, wo wir ja kaum Fuß gefasst hatten, kaum möglich gewesen.«[29]

 

Da noch kein eigenes Tonstudio zur Verfügung stand, wurde nach Übergangslösungen gesucht. Diese fand man zunächst im Tanzpalast Bal Bullier im 5. Arrondissement, 31–39 avenue d’Observatoire (hier wurden auch die genannten Kurzopern aufgenommen), kleine Chanson- und Tanzaufnahmen wurden in einem nahegelegenen Theater eingespielt.[30] Bald wurde aber die Notwendigkeit eines festen Quartiers deutlich:

 

»Da das Auf- und Abbauen der Apparate viel Zeit kostete, suchten wir nach einem eigenen Saal und fanden ganz in unserer Nähe einen leeren Fabriksaal mit ziemlich großen Ausmaßen, dem auch ein kleinerer Saal angeschlossen war. Hier richteten wir uns ein. Die Apparatur bekam einen ständigen Platz, von welchem beide Säle bedient werden konnten. Nur machten uns zunächst die Maschinengeräusche einer nebenan liegenden Schokoladenfabrik Kummer, bis wir zwei dicht nebeneinander liegende Holzwände auf dieser Seite zogen und diese mit Sand ausfüllten. Auch den hinteren großen Fußboden aus Zement deckten wir mit Sand und hatten nun eine ganz gute Akustik. Für das Orchester bauten wir ein Podium. In diesem Saal veranstalteten wir auch monatlich unsere Empfänge für unsere Kunden, denen wir unsere neue Produktion vorspielten. Eine Einrichtung, die ich trotz anfänglichen Protesten von Herrn Wünsch dann auch in Berlin in der Lützowstr. einführte.«[31]

 

Bei der genannten Schokoladenfabrik handelte es sich um die »Compagnie coloniale«, 68 boulevard de la Gare (heute boulevard Vincent Auriol),[32] die nur einen Katzensprung von der Polydor entfernt war; die beiden Aufnahmesäle, in denen im Laufe der 1930er Jahre auch Größen wie Louis Armstrong und Edith Piaf aufnahmen (72–74 boulevard de la Gare), lagen also in unmittelbarer Nähe der Polydor-Büros.
    
Im Januar 1930 fand die legendäre Erstaufnahme des »Boléro« unter Mitwirkung von Maurice Ravel statt. Erna Elchlepp selbst hatte den Komponisten zur Aufnahme für die Polydor bewogen:

 

»Das Lamoureux-Orchester unter Maître [Albert] Wolf [sic] konzertierte im Salle Gaveau und dort erfolgte auch die Uraufführung des »Bolero« von Ravel. Sofort nach Beendigung des Konzerts ging ich zu Maître Wolf und bat ihn, mich Ravel vorzustellen. Auf meine Bitte war er bereit, den Bolero für uns persönlich einzudirigieren und so brachten wir als erste Firma in authentischer Ausführung den Bolero heraus, der ein gutes Geschäft wurde.«[33]

 

Über die genaue Art von Ravels Beitrag zu dieser Aufnahme ist viel gerätselt worden; im Vorwort zu seiner Edition von Ravels »Boléro« von 2007[34] schreibt der Musikwissenschaftler Jean-François Monnard, Albert Wolff habe vier Jahre vor seinem Tod behauptet, die Einspielung selbst geleitet zu haben. Dem widerspricht die Darstellung der »Edition musicale vivante« vom Januar 1930 mit einem äußerst detailgenauen Bericht von der Aufnahmesitzung. Laut dieser fungierte Wolff beim »Boléro« als Ravels Assistent: Er probte mit dem Orchester das dem Komponisten genehme Tempo und übergab für die Aufnahme selbst dann Ravel den Taktstock.
Vollkommen problemlos ging die Einspielung übrigens nicht vonstatten: Ravel ruinierte gar einen Take, weil er einmal (zum großen Entsetzen der Techniker) den Taktstock laut und vernehmlich auf das Pult warf, noch bevor man vom Regieraum grünes Licht zur Entwarnung gegeben hatte. Bei der gleichen Sitzung wurde dann auch Ravels Menuet antique eingespielt, hier übernahm Albert Wolff die Leitung des Orchesters.[35] Die große Detailgenauigkeit des Berichts in der »Edition musicale vivante« spricht dafür, dass Ravel den »Boléro« selbst dirigiert hat.

Erna Elchlepp mit Maurice Ravel

Foto aus Privatbesitz, mit freundlicher Genehmigung

Laut Musikproduzent Jacques Canetti[36] und weiteren Quellen soll die Polydor-Aufnahme des »Boléro« im Bal Bullier stattgefunden haben. Verwirrung hinsichtlich des Aufnahmeorts stiften allerdings neu aufgefundene Fotos aus Privatbesitz, die Erna Elchlepp und Maurice Ravel im Polydor-Studio (erkennbar am Firmen-Logo auf dem Fußboden) einträchtig an einem Pult zeigen. Es ist bislang nicht klar nachzuweisen, bei welchem konkreten Anlass diese Fotos entstanden, ob etwa bei Proben zur »Boléro«-Einspielung oder bei einer späteren Aufnahme Ravels für die Polydor.[37] Ganz unabhängig allerdings von der Frage, wer letztlich den Taktstock führte und wo die Aufnahme genau stattfand, war Erna Elchlepps Verpflichtung von Maurice Ravel ein echter, äußerst werbewirksamer Coup und der unbestrittene Höhepunkt ihrer Zeit bei Polydor.

Aus den fünf Monaten, die sie die Polydor zunächst hatte leiten sollen, wurden letztlich 4 Jahre. Und es wären sicherlich noch viele weitere hinzugekommen; doch die durch das nationalsozialistische Regime herbeigeführten katastrophalen politischen Umwälzungen und Repressalien führten 1933 zu einer personellen Rochade bei der Deutschen Grammophon: Um dem für April angekündigten Boykott jüdischer Geschäfte und Unternehmen zu entgehen, flüchteten Fritz Schönheimer (im März 1933) und Bruno Borchardt zunächst in die Schweiz, von dort aus nach Frankreich;[38] im Mai verabschiedeten Schönheimer und Herbert Borchardt in Paris Erna Elchlepp, die nach Berlin zurückging. Fritz Schönheimer übernahm die Geschäftsführung der »Société Phonographique Française Polydor«, Bruno Borchardt die Leitung der Polydor Holding AG.[39]

Erna Elchlepps Abschied aus Paris, Mai 1933

Foto aus Privatbesitz, mit freundlicher Genehmigung

Auf dem Gruppenbild, das anlässlich der Verabschiedung von Erna Elchlepp entstand, ist die gesamte etwa 80-köpfige Polydor-Belegschaft zu sehen, versammelt im erwähnten Polydor-Aufnahmesaal. In der Mitte, etwas verloren wirkend, ist Erna Elchlepp zu sehen, umrahmt von ihrem Nachfolger Fritz Schönheimer und Herbert Borchardt.[40] »Für mich bedeutete dies einen schweren Abschied von einer schaffensfrohen Zeit«, erinnerte sie sich später.[41] Doch dem Ruf der Firma und den politischen Geschicken musste sie sich fügen.

In Berlin kam sie 1933 nicht wieder in die Exportabteilung zurück. Dank ihrer in Paris gesammelten Erfahrungen übertrug Direktor Hugo Wünsch ihr die »Künstlerabteilung« der Deutschen Grammophon, wo ihr die Repertoiregestaltung im Bereich der Klassik und der »leichten Muse« oblag.

Die Zeiten waren schwierig – in den Jahren nach Beginn der Weltwirtschaftskrise 1929 ging es mit dem Absatz der Phonowirtschaft rapide abwärts, die Preise für Schallplatten rauschten in den Keller. Während die Deutsche Grammophon 1930 in Hannover noch 6.85 Millionen Schallplatten gepresst hatte, waren es 1936 nur mehr 1.4 Millionen.[42] Im Zuge der Einsparungsmaßnahmen kam es zu massiven Kürzungen im Konzern und Betrieb; im August 1934 trennte man sich vom repräsentativen weitläufigen Gebäudekomplex mit Konzertsaal an der Markgrafenstraße 76 und siedelte in bescheidenere gemietete Räumlichkeiten in der Jerusalemer Straße um, im Herbst 1938 in die Ringbahnstraße 63 in Tempelhof.[43] Erna Elchlepp dazu:

 

»Ich erinnere mich noch, dass Herr Direktor Wünsch kam und mich bat, ein letztes Mal mit ihm durch die Räume zu gehen. Schweren Herzens gingen wir vorn durch die verwaisten Direktionsräume, durch den schönen Konzertsaal, der so wenig seiner Bestimmung gedient hatte, denn er war geplant gewesen, jungen Künstlern die Gelegenheit zu geben, vor Presse und gewähltem Publikum ihr erstes Debüt in Berlin zu machen. [...] Wir gedachten bei diesem Abschiedsgang auch des Rokoko-Kostümfestes, wozu dieser im Barockstil gehaltene Saal den richtigen Rahmen abgegeben hatte, uns bewusst werdend, wie schnell vergänglich Reichtum und Pracht oft sind.«[44]

Der Konzertsaal in der Markgrafenstraße 76

c.1920 aus Max Chop: Der Konzern Polyphon-Grammophon 1920

In ihrer Funktion als Leiterin der Produktion war Erna Elchlepp in Kontakt mit Künstlern aller Sparten. Im Popular-Bereich schloss sie unter anderem Verträge mit Johannes Heesters,[45] Mimi Thoma und Rudi Schuricke sowie den Orchestern von Oskar Joost, Erhard Bauschke und anderen. Durch die schlechte wirtschaftliche Lage war ihr Etat allerdings begrenzt, was dazu führte, dass vor allem im U-Bereich empfindlich eingespart wurde: »Was konnte ich z.B. mit einem Etat von 80.000 Mark anfangen, den ich um keinen Pfennig überschreiten durfte? Da durften Tanz-Aufnahmen nicht mehr als DM 150,- bis DM 200,- kosten, aber die Orchester Joost und Bauschke haben sie geschafft. An neue Abschlüsse war nicht zu denken.«[46]

Ein größerer finanzieller Spielraum stand erst wieder ab 1937 durch die Umgestaltung des DGG-Konzerns (von der AG in eine GmbH) und den Zusammenschluss mit Telefunken zur Verfügung.[47] So erlebte Erna Elchlepp Ende der 1930er Jahre Aufnahmen mit Victor de Sabata im Aufnahmestudio in der Alten Jakobstraße (»dieser temperamentvolle Musiker verlor die Geduld, als die Trompeter in Aida’s Einzugsmarsch nicht gleich so klangen, wie er es wollte, schmiss den Taktstock hin und wollte fort«), mit Herbert von Karajan an gleicher Stelle, mit Wilhelm Furtwängler, Paul van Kempen, mit Hans Pfitzner und Carl Schuricht (»Beide schwer zu behandeln [...] Herr Hasse, Herr Ehrich oder Herr Blaesche hatten es sicher nicht leicht, mit ihnen fertig zu werden«)[48] und vielen anderen Künstlern.

Die betriebsinterne  Stimmung dieser Jahre scheint aber dennoch gut gewesen zu sein: Für einen Betriebsausflug am 30. Juni 1939 bereiteten die Angestellte der Grammophon eine Scherz-Rundfunkreportage vor, die vermutlich beim Ausflug selbst vorgetragen oder »gesendet« wurde. Das Manuskript dieser munter-ironischen Aktion ist erhalten geblieben[49] und gibt ein paar kleine Einblicke hinter die Kulissen der Firma, darunter in die besonderen Stärken und Vorlieben der Mitarbeiter. Auch Erna Elchlepp ist unter dem Namen »Erna Dampf« vertreten, ein Pseudonym, das offenbar ihrer allseits bekannten Durchsetzungskraft geschuldet ist. Das Synonym der »Käsefabrik« für die Deutsche Grammophon war offenbar ein alter interner running gag, bezogen auf die wie Käseräder aussehenden Aufnahmewachs-Rohlinge.

»Das ist die wichtigste Person in unserer Käsefabrik, Erna Dampf, unsere künstlerische Käsemacherin – [Entgegnung des »Rundfunk«-Sprechers]: »Donnerwetter, alle Achtung! Ja, ja, das sogenannte schwache Geschlecht!« – Aber Erna Dampf ist der gute Geist der ganzen Käsefabrik. Sie muss ihre Nase in jeden Käse stecken. Sie bekümmert sich besonders um die jungen charmanten Käsemixer. Der aus Holland engagierte Spezialist Johannes [Heesters] und der talentierte Expert Gino [Sinimberghi?][50] sind ihre bevorzugten Lieblinge. Von weiblichen Käsemixern hält sie nicht viel. Mit unseren neuen Mixern Mario [Traversa][51] und Fin [Olsen][52] hat sie aber eine feine Nase für Qualitätskäsemacher bewiesen. Die von diesen beiden gemachten Käse werden bestimmt Kassenschlager werden.«[53]

 

Die »Crooner« hatten es Erna Elchlepp offenbar ganz besonders angetan. Der unbekümmert-naive Ton dieser »Rundfunk«–Betriebsreportage mutet angesichts der gleichzeitig stattfindenden rassistischen Umtriebe der Nationalsozialisten draußen allerdings merkwürdig an. Im April des gleichen Jahres, nur wenige Wochen vor dem Betriebsausflug, war es im Berliner »Delphi« zu einem Eklat gekommen: Der genannte Fin Olsen und die Tänzerin Viola Rosé, die mit der Band von Max Rumpf tourten, wurden von SA-Leuten von der Bühne gezerrt, weil diesen »der sogenannte »Excentric-Tanz« der beiden bereits als sehr dekadent angesehenen Künstler nicht zusagte und als »undeutsch« galt – obendrein hatte Olsen seine Homosexualität allzu offensichtlich präsentiert. [...] Olsen kam jedoch – als dänischer Staatsbürger – wieder frei und konnte sogar noch einige schöne Aufnahmen mit dem Erhard Bauschke-Orchester produzieren, ehe er Deutschland verlassen musste«.[54]

Am 1. September 1939 begann der Zweite Weltkrieg. Bereits im Dezember wurde im hauseigenen Händler-Magazin der Deutschen Grammophon »Die Stimme seines Herrn« aufgerufen: »Alte Schallplatten bitte zurückgeben! Die Schallplatte besteht zum Teil aus Material, das aus Feindstaaten kommt und gegenwärtig nicht eingeführt werden kann. Es muß deshalb versucht werden, durch Verwendung von Altmaterial die Fabrikation durchzuhalten.«[55] Noch während des Krieges kam es zu weiteren Veränderungen in den Eigentümerverhältnissen des DGG-Konzerns, durch die das Unternehmen 1941 als Tochtergesellschaft zu Siemens kam.[56]

Am 30. Januar 1944 wurde der Gebäudekomplex an der Ringbahnstraße 63 durch Brandbomben völlig zerstört; die erneut verkleinerte Belegschaft zog weiter in Räume in der Alten Jakobstraße über dem Aufnahmesaal, dem einstigen Central-Theater, in dem die DGG seit 1938 ihre Aufnahmen bestritt. Doch ein knappes Jahr später ging auch dieses Gebäude bei einem Bombenangriff am 3. Februar 1945 in Flammen auf. Glücklicherweise war an diesem Tag wegen Kohlenmangels nicht gearbeitet worden, sodass die Belegschaft der Deutschen Grammophon mit dem Schrecken davonkam, anders als die Bewohner des Vorderhauses, »diese waren in den Kellerräumen, die wir sonst auch benutzten, umgekommen«.[57]

Zwei Monate später traf Erna und ihre Familie in den letzten Kriegstagen ein traumatisches Ereignis: Bei den sogenannten »Brot-Revolten« kam es am 6. April 1945 in Berlin-Rahnsdorf zu Bürgerprotesten bei zwei Bäckern in der Fürstenwalder Allee. Der Ortsgruppenleiter der NSDAP hatte veranlasst, dass Sonderbrotmarken nur an Mitglieder nazistischer Vereinigungen ausgegeben werden durften. Daraufhin kam es zu Tumulten in der Hunger leidenden Bevölkerung, bei denen Margarete Elchlepp (die Frau von Ernas Bruder Walter Elchlepp) und ihre Schwester Gertrud Kleindienst zu vermitteln versuchten. Doch zusammen mit einigen weiteren Beteiligten verhaftete man sie und übergab sie einem Standgericht. Während Gertrud Kleindienst zu acht Jahren Zuchthaus verurteilt wurde, wurde Margarete Elchlepp (zusammen mit dem Tischler Max Hilliges) wegen »Wehrkraftzersetzung« und »Landfriedensbruchs« am 8. April kurz nach Mitternacht in Plötzensee enthauptet, die Morde in den Folgetagen zur Abschreckung in Rahnsdorf plakatiert.[58]

Erna Elchlepp hat damit schlimmste Gräueltaten des Naziregimes im Kern ihrer Familie erlebt. Leben und Tod lagen in jedem Moment nur um Haaresbreite auseinander. Wie schwer das psychische und physische Überleben im Berlin dieser Zeit war, können wir uns heute kaum vorstellen.
Dennoch ging das Leben in den Trümmern weiter – selbst das Schallplatten-Leben. Direkt nach Kriegsende versuchte die Deutsche Grammophon, mit Pressen und Maschinenteilen aus Hannover und Schallplatten-Altmaterial in den übriggebliebenen Reststümpfen des Ringstraßen-Gebäudes noch einmal eine Fabrikation nebst Vertrieb unter Leitung von Erna Elchlepp in Berlin aufzuziehen, um die Stadt selbst sowie die »Zone« mit Schallplatten zu beliefern; ein provisorisches Quartier bot die Zehlendorfer Villa von Hugo Wünsch (der 1948 verstarb). Selbst während der Berliner Luftbrücke fanden in Berlin im März 1949 noch Aufnahmen statt: »Wir nahmen damals mit dem Dresdner Kreuzchor unter Rudolf Mauersberger auf und mußten alle vier Minuten unterbrechen, weil ein Flugzeug über uns hinwegbrauste.«[59]

So kühn und vielversprechend diese Versuche auch waren, wurde durch die Blockade 1949 der Vertrieb in die Ostzone aber bald unmöglich. Der Hauptsitz der Deutschen Grammophon wurde daher nach Hannover verlegt, die Berliner Belegschaft teilweise dorthin übernommen.[60]

Auch Erna Elchlepp, nun Anfang 60, packte ihre Koffer und siedelte nach Hannover um, wo sie für drei Jahre zusammen mit Dr. Fred Hamel das Klassik-Repertoire aufbaute und versuchte, alte DGG-Künstler wieder neu für das Label zu gewinnen, Wilhelm Kempff besuchte sie dafür persönlich in Bremen, Heinrich Schlusnus warb sie nach einem Konzert in Hannover von der Decca ab.[61]

1953 trat Erna Elchlepp in Hannover offiziell in den Ruhestand. Doch das bedeutete trotzdem noch lange nicht das Ende ihrer beruflichen Tätigkeit: Direkt im Anschluss übernahm sie noch zwei weitere Jahre die Leitung des Berliner Büros der Deutschen Grammophon am Kurfürstendamm 26a. Demnach arbeitete sie sowohl in Hannover wie in Berlin noch mit der legendären DGG-Produzentin Elsa Schiller (1897–1974) zusammen.

Am 30. April 1955 nahm sie dann ihren endgültigen Abschied – oder doch nicht? Ganz aufhören konnte »Tante Erna« mit der Grammophon eigentlich nie: Ein greifbarer Beleg dafür, dass sie weiterhin Kontakt hielt, sind beispielsweise einige Telegramme und Kurzmitteilungen von und an Ferenc Fricsay von 1956–1962 im Fricsay-Archiv in der Akademie der Künste, Berlin.[62]

Was für ein intensives, teils inniges Verhältnis Erna Elchlepp mit ihren Kollegen und den Künstlern der Deutschen Grammophon verband, lässt sich an vielen kleinen Streiflichtern in ihrer Biographie ablesen. In den Wirren der Kriegsjahre bemühte sie sich, Kontakt zu den Musikern zu halten:

 

»Soweit mir die Feldadressen bekannt waren, hielt ich die Verbindung, auch mit Päckchen, aufrecht und oft war es rührend, mit welcher Anhänglichkeit besonders die Künstler der leichten Muse, wenn sie auf Urlaub waren, zu »ihrer Grammophon« kamen. So kam [Erhard] Bauschke und erzählte, dass er mit seinem Saxophon durch irgendeinen Fluss in Frankreich geschwommen sei und als einziges sein Saxophon gerettet habe. Vor einem zweiten Urlaub ist er umgekommen.[63] Ich war auch im Krankenhaus bei [Oskar] Joost, kurz bevor er starb.«[64]

 

Neben der persönlichen Anteilnahme half sie notleidenden Künstlern der Deutschen Grammophon in der harten Nachkriegszeit auch finanziell, indem sie wiederholt Hausrat oder andere Wertgegenstände von ihnen in Zahlung nahm. Wie sich ihre Pflegetochter erinnert, die Mitte der 1950er Jahre für einige Zeit zu ihr zog, tauchte dann und wann in ihrer Schöneberger Wohnung urplötzlich ein neues Möbelstück oder ein unbekannter Teppich auf, um irgendwann auch wieder zu verschwinden.

Die Verbindung zur Deutschen Grammophon hat Erna Elchlepp bis ins hohe Alter aufrechterhalten. Und den gewählten Lebensweg hat sie nie bereut: Auf die Frage, ob sie in ihrem langen erfolgreichen Leben alles richtig gemacht habe, entgegnete die 90jährige mit Nachdruck: »Ich würde alles genau wieder so machen!«[65]

Am 1. August 1979 starb Erna Elchlepp im Alter von fast 92 Jahren in Berlin. Als kurze Zeit später die Trauergesellschaft zur Beerdigung auf einem Berliner Friedhof versammelt war, um sie zur letzten Ruhe zu geleiten, musste die Feier kurzerhand abgeblasen und verschoben werden, da man an der falschen Grabstelle stand und die richtige nicht zu finden war. Als habe die unermüdliche »Tante Erna« noch einen letzten Einwand erhoben.

Dr. Eva Zöllner

(c) 2021

 

Den Angehörigen der Familie Elchlepp bin ich zu größtem Dank verpflichtet. Hervorheben möchte ich Frau Ute Steffen geb. Elchlepp, die Pflegetochter von Erna Elchlepp, die meine vielen Fragen in sehr zuvorkommender, freundlicher und geduldiger Weise beantwortet hat. Für die vertrauensvolle Vermittlung danke ich Herrn Dietrich Elchlepp, MdB/MdEP a.D., Jan Elchlepp sowie Pia Elchlepp.

Ebenso gilt mein herzlicher Dank Véronique Genouvès von der AFAS (Association française des détenteurs de documents sonores et audiovisuels) in Paris, sowie den AFAS-Mitgliedern Thomas Henry und Henri Chamoux für ihre äußerst freundliche und prompte Unterstützung bei meinen Fragen um das Polydor-Studio am Boulevard de la Gare.

Und an Rainer Maillard (Emil Berliner Studios) und Alan Newcombe (Deutsche Grammophon):
Dank für die Inspiration und die unermüdliche Unterstützung!

  1. [1] Maschinenschriftlicher Lebenslauf von Erna Elchlepp, in Privatbesitz. Wenn nicht anders angegeben, sind alle Details ihrer Schul- und Berufsausbildung diesem Dokument entnommen.     
  2. [2] In den Berliner Adressbüchern (Zentral- und Landesbibliothek Berlin / Digitale Landesbibliothek Berlin) ist Theodor Elchlepp ab 1884 als »Vertreter auswärtiger Webereien/Firmen der Textilbranche« verzeichnet, parallel dazu im Adreßbuch und Geschäftsanzeiger der Stadt Zittau bis 1896 als Kaufmann und »Lagerchef« (SLUB Dresden Hist.Sax.H.1959). Anfang 1886 verstarb ein in Berlin geborener Sohn von Theodor und Minna Elchlepp im Alter von drei Monaten, ebenfalls in Berlin (Landesarchiv Berlin, Personenstandsregister, Sterberegister 1886 Nr. 150). Die Familie scheint also noch einige Zeit zwischen Zittau und Berlin gependelt zu sein.
  3. [3] An der Königlichen Elisabethschule, Kochstraße 65.
  4. [4] »Erna Elchlepp feiert 90. Geburtstag. DGG-Pionierin erinnert sich in einem Gespräch mit Dr. Ursula Klein« (geführt am 1. August 1977), S. 1. Maschinenschriftliche Presseinformation Polydor, Kopie in Privatbesitz.
  5. [5] Vermutlich der Lette-Verein zur »Förderung höherer Bildung und Erwerbsfähigkeit des weiblichen Geschlechts«, vgl. »Statuten und Programme des Lette-Vereins« Berlin, 1907 auf der Website des Berufsausbildungszentrums Lette Verein Berlin (letteverein.berlin); auf Empfehlung von Erna Elchlepp absolvierte ihre Pflegetochter später eine kaufmännische Ausbildung in dieser Einrichtung. Es liegt nahe, dass die Empfehlung auf Elchlepps eigenen Erfahrungen basierte, sie also selbst vor dem Ersten Weltkrieg dort die Schulbank gedrückt hat, auch wenn sich das mangels überlieferter Schülerlisten nicht mehr nachprüfen lässt.
  6. [6] Vgl. Prof. Dr. Sylvia Schraut (2018): Mädchen- und Frauenbildung, in: Digitales Deutsches Frauenarchiv URL: www.digitales-deutsches-frauenarchiv.de/themen/maedchen-und-frauenbildung
  7. [7] Deutsche Dental-Gesellschaft Erhard Zacharias & Co, (bis 1908 unter Hedemannstraße 15, ab 1909 Linkstraße 2 in den Berliner Adressbüchern verzeichnet). Die Gesellschaft »zeichnete sich durch ihre metallenen Instrumentenschränke, Tische u.s.w. aus; diese Richtung, abwaschbare, sog. aseptische Möbel zu bieten, war durchweg bemerkbar«. Deutsche Monatsschrift für Zahnheilkunde 1909 (27), S. 776.
  8. [8] Subject Index to Correspondence and Case Files of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, 1903-1952. NARA microfilm publication T458, 31 rolls. Records of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, Record Group 85. National Archives, Washington, D.C., image 3262 (Zugriff via ancestry.de).
  9. [9] Maschinenschriftlicher Lebenslauf von Erna Elchlepp.
  10. [10] »Erna Elchlepp feiert 90. Geburtstag«, S. 1.
  11. [11] Vgl. Berliner Börsenzeitung 30. Januar 1918, S. 10.
  12. [12] Erna Elchlepp, »Mein Leben bei der Grammophon«, maschinenschriftliches Manuskript in Privatbesitz, S. 1
  13. [13] »Mein Leben bei der Grammophon«, S. 2.
  14. [14] »Mein Leben bei der Grammophon«, S. 3
  15. [15] Edwin Hein, »Grammophon – Ein Name macht Firmengeschichte«, maschinenschriftliches Manuskript im Museum für Energiegeschichte(n), Hannover, S. 47–48.
  16. [16] Erna Elchlepp, »Erlebtes«, maschinenschriftliches Manuskript, DGG-Archiv, Seite 1
  17. [17] »Mein Leben bei der Grammophon«, S. 4
  18. [18] Edwin Hein: »Grammophon – Ein Name macht Firmengeschichte«. S. 45–46.
  19. [19] Etablissements Hohner, 21 rue des Petites-Écuries, geführt von den Gebrüdern Coulon.
  20. [20] »Mein Leben bei der Grammophon«, S. 5
  21. [21] Edwin Hein: »Grammophon – Ein Name macht Firmengeschichte«. S. 55.
  22. [22] »POLYDOR acquiert, dans le courant de l’année 1929 les bureaux et les hangars de la société Maunoury, situés à la fois au 72–74 boulevard des la Gare et au 6–8 rue Jenner (Paris 13è). Il y avait là une manufacture de papier qui, notamment fournissait en rouleaux une maison d’édition de musique perforée située dans ce même quadrilatère.« Jacques Lubin, »Phonogrammes Polydor«, Bulletin de l’AFAS, S. 17–24. Archives des Sonorités. URL journals.openedition.org/afas/1603, S. 17. Maunoury, Wolff & Cie. produzierten unter anderem Pianorollen für 65- und 88er Klaviere unter der Marke Opéra-Paris. Die Fabrik in der rue Jenner 6 wurde aufgrund von finanziellen Schwierigkeiten aufgegeben und im Januar 1929 inseriert, vgl. Lorraine Aressy, History of EMP (L’Édition Musicale Perforée), Perforons la Musique Society Toulouse, online gestellt am 28. Januar 2002. URL www.mmdigest.com/MMMedia/EMP/EMP02.html
  23. [23] »Erna Elchlepp feiert 90. Geburtstag«, S. 3.
  24. [24] Das dürfte das Gebäude sein, für das die »Société phonographique française« = Polydor den im Bulletin municipal officiel (Bibliothéque national de France) vom 6. November 1930, S. 4686 veröffentlichten Bauantrag stellte: »13e arr. – Rue Bruant, 27. – Prop., Société phonographique française, 6, rue Jenner. – Magasins (2 étages).«
  25. [25] »Erlebtes«, S. 1–2. Mit diesem Neubau wollte man einerseits die vom französischen Markt geforderten Schlagerplatten schneller herausbringen, andererseits das Problem mit dem ursprünglich aus Hannover angelieferten Pressmaterials lösen, das den Transport nicht immer unbeschadet überstand; vgl. »Mein Leben bei der Grammophon«, S. 5.
  26. [26] Vgl. »Erlebtes«, S. 4. Ironie der Geschichte: Während an der Stelle der einstigen Polydor-Büros heute ein hässliches Mietshaus in Plattenbauweise steht, hat das kleine italienische Hotel, heute Hotel Jenner, 10 rue Jenner, den Lauf der Zeiten unbeschadet überdauert.
  27. [27] Vgl. »Erlebtes«, S. 2.
  28. [28] »Erlebtes«, S. 3
  29. [29] »Erlebtes«, S. 2–3.
  30. [30] Vgl. »Erlebtes«, S. 6
  31. [31] »Erlebtes«, S. 6.
  32. [32] Adresse laut Pariser Adressbuch von 1932, S. 678
  33. [33] »Erlebtes«, S. 3. Über das tagesgenaue Datum (9. oder 14. Januar 1930) herrscht seitens der Wissenschaft Uneinigkeit. Erna Elchlepps Bericht spricht aber für den 14. Januar: Das Orchestre Lamoureux unter Maurice Ravel bestritt am 11. Januar 1930 im Salle Gaveau eine konzertante Aufführung des »Boléro«, die sie im Publikum miterlebte;.Ravels Zusage zur Aufnahme erwirkte Erna Elchlepp erst am gleichen Abend, womit der 9. Januar ausscheidet.
  34. [34] Maurice Ravel, Bolero, ed. Jean-François Monnard, Breitkopf und Härtel 2007, S. 6.
  35. [35] Vgl. Arbie Orenstein (ed.): A Ravel Reader, Correspondence, Articles, Interviews. Dover Publications, 2003, S. 535.
  36. [36] In seiner Autobiographie On cherche jeune homme aimant la musique (Paris, Calmann-Lévy, 1978, S. 19). Canetti wurde von Erna Elchlepp selbst bei Polydor eingestellt, das Vorstellungsgespräch hinterließ bei ihm nachhaltigen Eindruck: »Vingt candidats s’étaient déjà présentés. Mlle Erna Elschlepp [sic], gérante de la société, me reçoit. C’est une digne Allemande, extremement pointilleuse. Je fais mon numéro en allemand, y ajoutant mon anglais, et mes connaissances en musique classique. Dix minutes après, je suis engagé, aux appointements fabuleux de mille trois cent francs par mois.« (a.a.O., S. 18)
  37. [37] Zumal Jacques Lubin (a.a.O., S. 18) festhält, die Studios (Grand salle & Studio 2) der Polydor seien erst ab April des Jahres in Betrieb gewesen. Erna Elchlepp wurde aber bereits im Mai 1933 aus Paris verabschiedet. Lubins Zeitangabe lässt sich mit den Elchlepp/Ravel-Photos nicht in Einklang bringen.
  38. [38] Sophie Fetthauer: Bruno Borchardt, Fritz Schönheimer in: Lexikon verfolgter Musiker und Musikerinnen der NS-Zeit, Claudia Maurer Zenck, Peter Petersen (Hg.), Hamburg: Universität Hamburg, 2006 URL www.lexm.uni-hamburg.de/object/lexm_lexmperson_00000851 & 00001092.
  39. [39] Edwin Hein, »Grammophon – Ein Name macht Firmengeschichte«. S. 65.
  40. [40] Jacques Canetti (im hellen Anzug) steht in der vorletzten Reihe, 7. von rechts
  41. [41] Erna Elchlepp, »Mein Leben bei der Grammophon«, maschinenschriftliches Manuskript, in Privatbesitz, S. 6
  42. [42] Edwin Hein, »Grammophon – Ein Name macht Firmengeschichte«. S. 66.
  43. [43] Edwin Hein, »Grammophon – Ein Name macht Firmengeschichte«. S. 66.
  44. [44] »Mein Leben bei der Grammophon«, S. 6
  45. [45] Der Niederländer Johannes Heesters (1903–2011) ließ sich 1936 in Berlin nieder und machte dort als Operettensänger (als Mitglied der Komischen Oper) und als Filmstar Karriere. Laut eigenem Bekunden (»Erna Elchlepp feiert 90. Geburtstag«) hatte Erna Elchlepp selbst dafür gesorgt, dass Johannes Heesters einen Filmvertrag bei der Ufa erhielt, »als beste Voraussetzung für gute Umsätze«, vgl. S. 4.
  46. [46] »Mein Leben bei der Grammophon«, S. 6–7
  47. [47] »Mein Leben bei der Grammophon«, S. 7
  48. [48] Beide Zitate aus »Erlebtes«, S. 4–5
  49. [49] Rundfunkreportage anlässlich des Betriebsausflugs der Deutsche Grammophon GmbH am 30. Juni 1939. Maschinenschriftliches Manuskript, DGG-Archiv.
  50. [50] Wahrscheinlich Gino Sinimberghi (1913–1996), italienischer Tenor, Mitglied der Berliner Staatsoper von 1937–44, der in dieser Zeit für Polydor und DGG aufnahm.
  51. [51] Mario Traversa (1912–1997), Konzertmeister unter Toscanini an der Scala; trat in den 1930er und 1940er Jahren zusammen mit der Kapelle der Gebrüder Schoener auf und nahm für die DGG mehrere Platten in dieser Formation auf.
  52. [52] Der dänische Sänger Fin Olsen (1914–2003) hatte ebenfalls gerade eine Schallplatte mit dem Erhard Bauschke Orchester vorgelegt (vgl. »Die Stimme seines Herrn, Hausmitteilungen der Deutschen Grammophon«, Juli/August 1939).
  53. [53] Rundfunkreportage, S. 12.
  54. [54] Horst H. Lange, »Zwischen Optik und Hot-Takt – Max Rumpf«, Fox auf 78 Nr. 5 (1988), S. 4
  55. [55] »Die Stimme seines Herrn, Hausmitteilungen der Deutschen Grammophon«, Dezember 1939, S. 5.
  56. [56] Über die rasch wechselnden Eigentümerverhältnisse bei DGG / Telefunken / Siemens Ende der 1930er / Anfang der 1940er Jahre vgl. u.a. Rüdiger Bloemeke: Die TELDEC-Story. Wie eine Plattenfirma unser Leben veränderte, Voodoo-Verlag 2020, S. 18.
  57. [57] »Mein Leben bei der Grammophon«, S. 8
  58. [58] Heinrich-Wilhelm Wöhrmann, Berlin | Widerstand 1933–1945. Widerstand in Köpenick und Treptow. Gedenkstätte Deutscher Widerstand, Berlin 2008, S. 284. Berlin-Charlottenburg, Sterberegister, Nr. 1615
  59. [59] »Erna Elchlepp feiert 90. Geburtstag«, S. 4
  60. [60] »Mein Leben bei der Grammophon«, S. 8
  61. [61] »Erlebtes«, S. 5.
  62. [62] Akademie der Künste Berlin, Ferenc-Fricsay-Archiv, Sign. 620
  63. [63] Möglicherweise hatte Erna Elchlepp Bauschkes Ende nicht mehr mitbekommen: Der Orchesterleiter überlebte den Krieg und spielte nach seiner Entlassung aus der Kriegsgefangenschaft für einige Monate für Clubs der amerikanischen Armee im Frankfurter Raum. Nach einem solchen Auftritt starb er in Alt-Praunheim am 7. Oktober 1945, ein Jeep hatte ihn tödlich erfasst. (Sterberegister Frankfurt VI 1945 Nr. 790/VI, Zugriff via ancestry).
  64. [64] »Erlebtes«, S. 5. Oskar Joost starb am 29. Mai 1941 in der Charité an Lungenkrebs (Sterberegister Berlin-Wilmersdorf 1941 Nr. 906, Zugriff via ancestry).
  65. [65] »Erna Elchlepp feiert 90. Geburtstag«, S. 5